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Article

Seedling Emergence from Seed Banks in Ludwigia hexapetala-Invaded Wetlands: Implications for Restoration

1
USDA-ARS Invasive Species and Pollinator Health Research Unit, Department of Plant Sciences MS-4, University of California, Davis, 1 Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, USA
2
Departamento de Biología Vegetal y Ecología. Universidad de Sevilla, Ap. 1095, 41080 Sevilla, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Plants 2019, 8(11), 451; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants8110451
Received: 30 September 2019 / Revised: 21 October 2019 / Accepted: 23 October 2019 / Published: 25 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Seed Behavior in Soil)
Soil seed banks play a critical role in the maintenance of wetland plant communities and contribute to revegetation following disturbances. Analysis of the seed bank can therefore inform restoration planning and management. Emergence from seed banks may vary in response to hydrologic conditions and sediment disturbances. To assess the community-level impact of exotic Ludwigia hexapetala on soil seed banks, we compared differences in species composition of standing vegetation among invaded and non-invaded wetlands and the degree of similarity between vegetation and soil seed banks in northern California. To determine potential seed bank recruitment of L. hexapetala and associated plant species, we conducted a seedling emergence assay in response to inundation regime (drawdown vs. flooded) and sediment depth (surface vs. buried). Plant species richness, evenness, and Shannon’s H’ diversity were substantially lower in standing vegetation at L. hexapetala invaded sites as compared to non-invaded sites. Over 12 months, 69 plant taxa germinated from the seed banks, including L. hexapetala and several other exotic taxa. Seedling density varied among sites, being the highest (10,500 seedlings m−2) in surface sediments from non-invaded sites subjected to drawdown treatments. These results signal the need for invasive plant management strategies to deplete undesirable seed banks for restoration success. View Full-Text
Keywords: invasion ecology; invasive species; plant invasions; wetland restoration invasion ecology; invasive species; plant invasions; wetland restoration
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MDPI and ACS Style

Grewell, B.J.; Gillard, M.B.; Futrell, C.J.; Castillo, J.M. Seedling Emergence from Seed Banks in Ludwigia hexapetala-Invaded Wetlands: Implications for Restoration. Plants 2019, 8, 451. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants8110451

AMA Style

Grewell BJ, Gillard MB, Futrell CJ, Castillo JM. Seedling Emergence from Seed Banks in Ludwigia hexapetala-Invaded Wetlands: Implications for Restoration. Plants. 2019; 8(11):451. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants8110451

Chicago/Turabian Style

Grewell, Brenda J., Morgane B. Gillard, Caryn J. Futrell, and Jesús M. Castillo 2019. "Seedling Emergence from Seed Banks in Ludwigia hexapetala-Invaded Wetlands: Implications for Restoration" Plants 8, no. 11: 451. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants8110451

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