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Plants 2018, 7(4), 111; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants7040111

Translating Flowering Time from Arabidopsis thaliana to Brassicaceae and Asteraceae Crop Species

1
ENZA Zaden Research & Development B.V., Haling 1E, 1602 DB Enkhuizen, The Netherlands
2
Swammerdam Institute for Life Sciences (SILS), University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH Amsterdam, The Netherlands
3
Istituto di Biologia e Biotecnologia Agraria (IBBA), Operative Unit of Rome, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), via Salaria Km. 29,300, 00015 Monterotondo Scalo, Roma, Italy
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 1 November 2018 / Revised: 7 December 2018 / Accepted: 13 December 2018 / Published: 16 December 2018
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Abstract

Flowering and seed set are essential for plant species to survive, hence plants need to adapt to highly variable environments to flower in the most favorable conditions. Endogenous cues such as plant age and hormones coordinate with the environmental cues like temperature and day length to determine optimal time for the transition from vegetative to reproductive growth. In a breeding context, controlling flowering time would help to speed up the production of new hybrids and produce high yield throughout the year. The flowering time genetic network is extensively studied in the plant model species Arabidopsis thaliana, however this knowledge is still limited in most crops. This article reviews evidence of conservation and divergence of flowering time regulation in A. thaliana with its related crop species in the Brassicaceae and with more distant vegetable crops within the Asteraceae family. Despite the overall conservation of most flowering time pathways in these families, many genes controlling this trait remain elusive, and the function of most Arabidopsis homologs in these crops are yet to be determined. However, the knowledge gathered so far in both model and crop species can be already exploited in vegetable crop breeding for flowering time control. View Full-Text
Keywords: Brassicaceae; Asteraceae; flowering time; photoperiod; vernalization; ambient temperature; gibberellins; age; plant breeding Brassicaceae; Asteraceae; flowering time; photoperiod; vernalization; ambient temperature; gibberellins; age; plant breeding
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Leijten, W.; Koes, R.; Roobeek, I.; Frugis, G. Translating Flowering Time from Arabidopsis thaliana to Brassicaceae and Asteraceae Crop Species. Plants 2018, 7, 111.

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