Next Article in Journal
Genome-Wide Analysis of Glycoside Hydrolase Family 35 Genes and Their Potential Roles in Cell Wall Development in Medicago truncatula
Next Article in Special Issue
Green Synthesized ZnO Nanoparticles Mediated by Streptomyces plicatus: Characterizations, Antimicrobial and Nematicidal Activities and Cytogenetic Effects
Previous Article in Journal
Revitalizing Fertility of Nutrient-Deficient Virgin Sandy Soil Using Leguminous Biocompost Boosts Phaseolus vulgaris Performance
Previous Article in Special Issue
Harnessing Bacterial Endophytes for Promotion of Plant Growth and Biotechnological Applications: An Overview
 
 
Article

Fresh Compost Tea Application Does Not Change Rhizosphere Soil Bacterial Community Structure, and Has No Effects on Soybean Growth or Yield

1
Institut de Recherche en Biologie Végétale (IRBV), Université de Montréal, 4101 Rue Sherbrooke Est, Montréal, QC H1X 2B2, Canada
2
Écomestible Inc., 470 Rue Constable, McMasterVille, QC J3G 1N6, Canada
3
African Genome Center, Mohammed VI Polytechnic University (UM6P), Lot 660, Hay Moulay Rachid, Ben Guerir 43150, Morocco
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Othmane Merah
Plants 2021, 10(8), 1638; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10081638
Received: 30 June 2021 / Revised: 5 August 2021 / Accepted: 6 August 2021 / Published: 10 August 2021
Soil bacteria drive key ecosystem functions, including nutrient mobilization, soil aggregation and crop bioprotection against pathogens. Bacterial diversity is thus considered a key component of soil health. Conventional agriculture reduces bacterial diversity in many ways. Compost tea has been suggested as a bioinoculant that may restore bacterial community diversity and promote crop performance under conventional agriculture. Here, we conducted a field experiment to test this hypothesis in a soybean-maize rotation. Compost tea application had no influence on bacterial diversity or community structure. Plant growth and yield were also unresponsive to compost tea application. Combined, our results suggest that our compost tea bacteria did not thrive in the soil, and that the positive impacts of compost tea applications reported elsewhere may be caused by different microbial groups (e.g., fungi, protists and nematodes) or by abiotic effects on soil (e.g., contribution of nutrients and dissolved organic matter). Further investigations are needed to elucidate the mechanisms through which compost tea influences crop performance. View Full-Text
Keywords: conventional agriculture; sustainable agriculture; compost tea; bacteria; biodiversity; illumina MiSeq sequencing; plant growth; yield; soybean conventional agriculture; sustainable agriculture; compost tea; bacteria; biodiversity; illumina MiSeq sequencing; plant growth; yield; soybean
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Bali, R.; Pineault, J.; Chagnon, P.-L.; Hijri, M. Fresh Compost Tea Application Does Not Change Rhizosphere Soil Bacterial Community Structure, and Has No Effects on Soybean Growth or Yield. Plants 2021, 10, 1638. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10081638

AMA Style

Bali R, Pineault J, Chagnon P-L, Hijri M. Fresh Compost Tea Application Does Not Change Rhizosphere Soil Bacterial Community Structure, and Has No Effects on Soybean Growth or Yield. Plants. 2021; 10(8):1638. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10081638

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bali, Rana, Jonathan Pineault, Pierre-Luc Chagnon, and Mohamed Hijri. 2021. "Fresh Compost Tea Application Does Not Change Rhizosphere Soil Bacterial Community Structure, and Has No Effects on Soybean Growth or Yield" Plants 10, no. 8: 1638. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10081638

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop