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Open AccessArticle

Elevated Carbon Dioxide and Chronic Warming Together Decrease Nitrogen Uptake Rate, Net Translocation, and Assimilation in Tomato

1
Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606, USA
2
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606, USA
3
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Toledo, OH 43606, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: James Bunce
Plants 2021, 10(4), 722; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10040722
Received: 17 March 2021 / Revised: 2 April 2021 / Accepted: 6 April 2021 / Published: 8 April 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Crop Adaptation to Elevated CO2 and Temperature)
The response of plant N relations to the combination of elevated CO2 (eCO2) and warming are poorly understood. To study this, tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants were grown at 400 or 700 ppm CO2 and 33/28 or 38/33 °C (day/night), and their soil was labeled with 15NO3 or 15NH4+. Plant dry mass, root N-uptake rate, root-to-shoot net N translocation, whole-plant N assimilation, and root resource availability (%C, %N, total nonstructural carbohydrates) were measured. Relative to eCO2 or warming alone, eCO2 + warming decreased growth, NO3 and NH4+-uptake rates, root-to-shoot net N translocation, and whole-plant N assimilation. Decreased N assimilation with eCO2 + warming was driven mostly by inhibition of NO3 assimilation, and was not associated with root resource limitations or damage to N-assimilatory proteins. Previously, we showed in tomato that eCO2 + warming decreases the concentration of N-uptake and -assimilatory proteins in roots, and dramatically increases leaf angle, which decreases whole-plant light capture and, hence, photosynthesis and growth. Thus, decreases in N uptake and assimilation with eCO2 + warming in tomato are likely due to reduced plant N demand. View Full-Text
Keywords: climate change; elevated CO2; heat stress; nitrogen assimilation; nitrogen metabolism; nitrogen uptake; Solanum; tomato; warming climate change; elevated CO2; heat stress; nitrogen assimilation; nitrogen metabolism; nitrogen uptake; Solanum; tomato; warming
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MDPI and ACS Style

Jayawardena, D.M.; Heckathorn, S.A.; Rajanayake, K.K.; Boldt, J.K.; Isailovic, D. Elevated Carbon Dioxide and Chronic Warming Together Decrease Nitrogen Uptake Rate, Net Translocation, and Assimilation in Tomato. Plants 2021, 10, 722. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10040722

AMA Style

Jayawardena DM, Heckathorn SA, Rajanayake KK, Boldt JK, Isailovic D. Elevated Carbon Dioxide and Chronic Warming Together Decrease Nitrogen Uptake Rate, Net Translocation, and Assimilation in Tomato. Plants. 2021; 10(4):722. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10040722

Chicago/Turabian Style

Jayawardena, Dileepa M.; Heckathorn, Scott A.; Rajanayake, Krishani K.; Boldt, Jennifer K.; Isailovic, Dragan. 2021. "Elevated Carbon Dioxide and Chronic Warming Together Decrease Nitrogen Uptake Rate, Net Translocation, and Assimilation in Tomato" Plants 10, no. 4: 722. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10040722

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