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Open AccessArticle

Proximate Analyses and Amino Acid Composition of Selected Wild Indigenous Fruits of Southern Africa

1
Department of Botany and Plant Biotechnology, APK Campus, University of Johannesburg, P.O. Box 524, Auckland Park, Johannesburg 2006, South Africa
2
Department of Biotechnology and Food Technology, DFC Campus, University of Johannesburg, P.O. Box 17011, Doornfontein, Johannesburg 2028, South Africa
3
Department of Consumer and Food Sciences, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0028, South Africa
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Riccardo Motti
Plants 2021, 10(4), 721; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10040721
Received: 21 January 2021 / Revised: 13 March 2021 / Accepted: 15 March 2021 / Published: 8 April 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Botany of Food Plants)
A literature survey revealed that several wild indigenous Southern African fruits had previously not been evaluated for their proximate and amino acid composition, as well as the total energy value (caloric value). Fourteen species including Carissa macrocarpa, Carpobrotus edulis, Dovyalis caffra, Halleria lucida, Manilkara mochisia, Pappea capensis, Phoenix reclinata, and Syzygium guineense were analyzed in this study. The nutritional values for several species such as C. edulis, H. lucida, P. reclinata, and M. mochisia are being reported here for the first time. The following fruits had the highest proximate values: C. macrocarpa (ash at 20.42 mg/100 g), S. guineense (fat at 7.75 mg/100 g), P. reclinata (fiber at 29.89 mg/100 g), and H. lucida (protein at 6.98 mg/100 g and carbohydrates at 36.98 mg/100 g). Essential amino acids such as histidine, isoleucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, tryptophan, and valine were reported in all studied indigenous fruits. The high protein content in H. lucida was exhibited by the highest amino acid quantities for histidine. However, the fruits are a poor source of proteins since the content is lower than the recommended daily intake. The jacket-plum (Pappea capensis), on the other hand, meets and exceeds the required daily intake of lysine (0.0003 g/100 g or 13 mg/kg) recommended by the World Health Organization. View Full-Text
Keywords: indigenous fruits; mineral; nutrition; proximate; Southern Africa; vitamin indigenous fruits; mineral; nutrition; proximate; Southern Africa; vitamin
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MDPI and ACS Style

Sibiya, N.P.; Kayitesi, E.; Moteetee, A.N. Proximate Analyses and Amino Acid Composition of Selected Wild Indigenous Fruits of Southern Africa. Plants 2021, 10, 721. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10040721

AMA Style

Sibiya NP, Kayitesi E, Moteetee AN. Proximate Analyses and Amino Acid Composition of Selected Wild Indigenous Fruits of Southern Africa. Plants. 2021; 10(4):721. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10040721

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sibiya, Nozipho P.; Kayitesi, Eugenie; Moteetee, Annah N. 2021. "Proximate Analyses and Amino Acid Composition of Selected Wild Indigenous Fruits of Southern Africa" Plants 10, no. 4: 721. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10040721

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