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Article

Phytodepuration of Nitrate Contaminated Water Using Four Different Tree Species

Department of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Sciences, University of Perugia, Via Borgo XX Giugno 74, 06121 Perugia, Italy
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Giedrė Kacienė
Plants 2021, 10(3), 515; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10030515
Received: 17 February 2021 / Revised: 8 March 2021 / Accepted: 8 March 2021 / Published: 10 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Responses to Environmental Pollution)
Water pollution by excessive amounts of nitrate (NO3) has become a global issue. Technologies to clean up nitrate-contaminated water bodies include phytoremediation. In this context, this research aimed to evaluate four tree species (Salix alba L., Populus alba L., Corylus avellana L. and Sambucus nigra L.) to remediate nitrate-contaminated waters (100 and 300 mg L−1). Some physiological parameters showed that S. alba L. and P. alba L. increased particularly photosynthetic activity, chlorophyll content, dry weight, and transpired water, following the treatments with the above NO3 concentrations. Furthermore, these species were more efficient than the others studied in the phytodepuration of water contaminated by the two NO3 levels. In particular, within 15 days of treatment, S. alba L. and P. alba L. removed nitrate quantities ranging from 39 to 78%. Differently, C. avellana L. and S. nigra L. did not show particular responses regarding the physiological traits studied. Nonetheless, these species removed up to 30% of nitrate from water. In conclusion, these data provide exciting indications on the chance of using S. alba L. and P. alba L. to populate buffer strips to avoid NO3 environmental dispersion in agricultural areas. View Full-Text
Keywords: phytoremediation; tree species; nitrate pollution; buffer strips; Salix alba L.; Populus alba L.; Corylus avellana L.; Sambucus nigra L. phytoremediation; tree species; nitrate pollution; buffer strips; Salix alba L.; Populus alba L.; Corylus avellana L.; Sambucus nigra L.
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MDPI and ACS Style

Regni, L.; Bartucca, M.L.; Pannacci, E.; Tei, F.; Del Buono, D.; Proietti, P. Phytodepuration of Nitrate Contaminated Water Using Four Different Tree Species. Plants 2021, 10, 515. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10030515

AMA Style

Regni L, Bartucca ML, Pannacci E, Tei F, Del Buono D, Proietti P. Phytodepuration of Nitrate Contaminated Water Using Four Different Tree Species. Plants. 2021; 10(3):515. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10030515

Chicago/Turabian Style

Regni, Luca, Maria L. Bartucca, Euro Pannacci, Francesco Tei, Daniele Del Buono, and Primo Proietti. 2021. "Phytodepuration of Nitrate Contaminated Water Using Four Different Tree Species" Plants 10, no. 3: 515. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10030515

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