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Review

A Review on Medicinal Plants Used in the Management of Headache in Africa

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Indigenous Knowledge Systems Centre, Faculty of Natural and Agricultural Sciences, North-West University, Private Bag X2046, Mmabatho 2790, South Africa
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Food Security and Safety Niche Area, Faculty of Natural and Agricultural Sciences, North-West University, Private Bag X2046, Mmabatho 2790, South Africa
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Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Calvin O. Qualset
Plants 2021, 10(10), 2038; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10102038
Received: 29 July 2021 / Revised: 28 August 2021 / Accepted: 4 September 2021 / Published: 28 September 2021
The use of medicinal plants in the management of diverse ailments is entrenched in the culture of indigenous people in African communities. This review provides a critical appraisal of the ethnobotanical uses of medicinal plants for the management of headache in Africa. Research articles published from 2010 (Jan) to 2021 (July) with keywords such as Africa, ethnobotany, headache, medicinal plant and traditional medicine were assessed for eligibility based on sets of pre-defined criteria. A total of 117 plants, representing 56 families, were documented from the 87 eligible studies. Asteraceae (10%), Fabaceae (10%), Lamiaceae (9%) and Mimosaceae (5%) were the most represented plant families. The most popular plant species used in the management of headache were Ocimum gratissimum L. (n = 7), Allium sativum L. (n = 3), Ricinus communis L. (n = 3) and Artemisia afra Jack. ex. Wild (n = 2). The leaves (49%), roots (20%) and bark (12%) were the most common plant parts used. Decoction (40%) and infusion (16%) were the preferred methods of preparation, whereas the oral route (52%) was the most preferred route of administration. The data revealed that medicinal plants continue to play vital roles in the management of headache in African communities. In an attempt to fully explore the benefits from the therapeutic potential of indigenous flora for common ailments, further studies are essential to generate empirical evidence on their efficacies, using appropriate test systems/models. This approach may assist with the ongoing drive towards the integration of African traditional medicine within mainstream healthcare systems. View Full-Text
Keywords: asteraceae; Fabaceae; traditional medicine; orthodox conventional medicine; indigenous population asteraceae; Fabaceae; traditional medicine; orthodox conventional medicine; indigenous population
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MDPI and ACS Style

Frimpong, E.K.; Asong, J.A.; Aremu, A.O. A Review on Medicinal Plants Used in the Management of Headache in Africa. Plants 2021, 10, 2038. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10102038

AMA Style

Frimpong EK, Asong JA, Aremu AO. A Review on Medicinal Plants Used in the Management of Headache in Africa. Plants. 2021; 10(10):2038. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10102038

Chicago/Turabian Style

Frimpong, Ebenezer Kwabena, John Awungnjia Asong, and Adeyemi Oladapo Aremu. 2021. "A Review on Medicinal Plants Used in the Management of Headache in Africa" Plants 10, no. 10: 2038. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10102038

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