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How Culture and Sociopolitical Tensions Might Influence People’s Acceptance of COVID-19 Control Measures That Use Individual-Level Georeferenced Data

1
Institute of Space and Earth Information Science, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong
2
Department of Geography and Resource Management, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong
3
Center for Geographic Analysis, Institute for Quantitative Social Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Wolfgang Kainz
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2021, 10(7), 490; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi10070490
Received: 9 June 2021 / Revised: 15 July 2021 / Accepted: 16 July 2021 / Published: 20 July 2021
This study extends an earlier study in the United States and South Korea on people’s privacy concerns for and acceptance of COVID-19 control measures that use individual-level georeferenced data (IGD). Using a new dataset collected via an online survey in Hong Kong, we first examine the influence of culture and recent sociopolitical tensions on people’s privacy concerns for and acceptance of three types of COVID-19 control measures that use IGD: contact tracing, self-quarantine monitoring, and location disclosure. We then compare Hong Kong people’s views with the views of people in the United States and South Korea using the pooled data of the three study areas. The results indicate that, when compared to people in the United States and South Korea, people in Hong Kong have a lower acceptance rate for digital contact tracing and higher acceptance rates for self-quarantine monitoring using e-wristbands and location disclosure. Further, there is geographic heterogeneity in the age and gender differences in privacy concerns, perceived social benefits, and acceptance of COVID-19 control measures: young people (age < 24) and women in Hong Kong and South Korea have greater privacy concerns than men. Further, age and gender differences in privacy concerns, perceived social benefits, and acceptance of COVID-19 control measures in Hong Kong and South Korea are larger than those in the United States, and people in Hong Kong have the largest age and gender differences in privacy concerns, perceived social benefits, and acceptance of COVID-19 measures among the three study areas. View Full-Text
Keywords: COVID-19; privacy; geoprivacy; contact tracing; self-quarantine; age and gender difference COVID-19; privacy; geoprivacy; contact tracing; self-quarantine; age and gender difference
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MDPI and ACS Style

Huang, J.; Kwan, M.-P.; Kim, J. How Culture and Sociopolitical Tensions Might Influence People’s Acceptance of COVID-19 Control Measures That Use Individual-Level Georeferenced Data. ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2021, 10, 490. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi10070490

AMA Style

Huang J, Kwan M-P, Kim J. How Culture and Sociopolitical Tensions Might Influence People’s Acceptance of COVID-19 Control Measures That Use Individual-Level Georeferenced Data. ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information. 2021; 10(7):490. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi10070490

Chicago/Turabian Style

Huang, Jianwei, Mei-Po Kwan, and Junghwan Kim. 2021. "How Culture and Sociopolitical Tensions Might Influence People’s Acceptance of COVID-19 Control Measures That Use Individual-Level Georeferenced Data" ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information 10, no. 7: 490. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi10070490

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