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Metabolites 2019, 9(1), 18; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo9010018

GC-MS Metabolomics Reveals Distinct Profiles of Low- and High-Grade Bladder Cancer Cultured Cells

1
UCIBIO/REQUIMTE, Department of Biological Sciences, Laboratory of Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Porto, 4050-313 Porto, Portugal
2
Cancer Biology & Epigenetics Group, Research Center (CI-IPOP) Portuguese Oncology Institute of Porto (IPO Porto), 4200-072 Porto, Portugal
3
Department of Pathology and Molecular Immunology-Biomedical Sciences Institute (ICBAS), University of Porto, 4050-313 Porto, Portugal
4
Department of Pathology, Portuguese Oncology Institute of Porto (IPO Porto), 4200-072 Porto, Portugal
5
UFP Energy, Environment and Health Research Unit (FP-ENAS), University Fernando Pessoa, 4249-004 Porto, Portugal
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 26 December 2018 / Revised: 11 January 2019 / Accepted: 15 January 2019 / Published: 18 January 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cancer Metabolomics 2018)
Full-Text   |   PDF [952 KB, uploaded 18 January 2019]   |  

Abstract

Previous studies have shown that metabolomics can be a useful tool to better understand the mechanisms of carcinogenesis; however, alterations in biochemical pathways that lead to bladder cancer (BC) development have hitherto not been fully investigated. In this study, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-based metabolomics was applied to unveil the metabolic alterations between low-grade and high-grade BC cultured cell lines. Multivariable analysis revealed a panel of metabolites responsible for the separation between the two tumorigenic cell lines. Significantly lower levels of fatty acids, including myristic, palmitic, and palmitoleic acids, were found in high-grade versus low-grade BC cells. Furthermore, significantly altered levels of some amino acids were observed between low- and high-grade BC, namely glycine, leucine, methionine, valine, and aspartic acid. This study successfully demonstrated the potential of metabolomic analysis to discriminate BC cells according to tumor aggressiveness. Moreover, these findings suggest that bladder tumorigenic cell lines of different grades disclose distinct metabolic profiles, mainly affecting fatty acid biosynthesis and amino acid metabolism to compensate for higher energetic needs. View Full-Text
Keywords: bladder cancer; cancer progression; in vitro; metabolomic signatures; endometabolome; GC-MS; metabolic pathways bladder cancer; cancer progression; in vitro; metabolomic signatures; endometabolome; GC-MS; metabolic pathways
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Rodrigues, D.; Pinto, J.; Araújo, A.M.; Jerónimo, C.; Henrique, R.; Bastos, M.L.; Guedes de Pinho, P.; Carvalho, M. GC-MS Metabolomics Reveals Distinct Profiles of Low- and High-Grade Bladder Cancer Cultured Cells. Metabolites 2019, 9, 18.

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