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Article

Mass Spectrometry-Based Flavor Monitoring of Peruvian Chocolate Fabrication Process

1
Institute of Omics Research and Applied Biotechnology (Instituto de Ciencias Ómicas y Biotecnología Aplicada, ICOBA), Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú, Lima 15088, Peru
2
Post-Graduate Program in Food Technology, Universidad Nacional Agraria la Molina, Lima 15024, Peru
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Helen Gika and Leonardo Tenori
Metabolites 2021, 11(2), 71; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo11020071
Received: 14 October 2020 / Revised: 16 January 2021 / Accepted: 21 January 2021 / Published: 26 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabolomics Methodologies and Applications II)
Flavor is one of the most prominent characteristics of chocolate and is crucial in determining the price the consumer is willing to pay. At present, two types of cocoa beans have been characterized according to their flavor and aroma profile, i.e., (1) the bulk (or ordinary) and (2) the fine flavor cocoa (FFC). The FFC has been distinguished from bulk cocoa for having a great variety of flavors. Aiming to differentiate the FFC bean origin of Peruvian chocolate, an analytical methodology using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed. This methodology allows us to characterize eleven volatile organic compounds correlated to the aromatic profile of FFC chocolate from this geographical region (based on buttery, fruity, floral, ethereal sweet, and roasted flavors). Monitoring these 11 flavor compounds during the chain of industrial processes in a retrospective way, starting from the final chocolate bar towards pre-roasted cocoa beans, allows us to better understand the cocoa flavor development involved during each stage. Hence, this methodology was useful to distinguish chocolates from different regions, north and south of Peru, and production lines. This research can benefit the chocolate industry as a quality control protocol, from the raw material to the final product. View Full-Text
Keywords: GC-MS; flavor VOCs; sensory analysis; HS-SPME; monitoring manufacturing process GC-MS; flavor VOCs; sensory analysis; HS-SPME; monitoring manufacturing process
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MDPI and ACS Style

Michel, S.; Baraka, L.F.; Ibañez, A.J.; Mansurova, M. Mass Spectrometry-Based Flavor Monitoring of Peruvian Chocolate Fabrication Process. Metabolites 2021, 11, 71. https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo11020071

AMA Style

Michel S, Baraka LF, Ibañez AJ, Mansurova M. Mass Spectrometry-Based Flavor Monitoring of Peruvian Chocolate Fabrication Process. Metabolites. 2021; 11(2):71. https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo11020071

Chicago/Turabian Style

Michel, Stephanie, Luka F. Baraka, Alfredo J. Ibañez, and Madina Mansurova. 2021. "Mass Spectrometry-Based Flavor Monitoring of Peruvian Chocolate Fabrication Process" Metabolites 11, no. 2: 71. https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo11020071

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