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Open AccessArticle

The Relationship between Walking Speed and Step Length in Older Aged Patients

1
Department of Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Shonan University of Medical Sciences, Yokohama 244-0806, Japan
2
Cardiovascular stroke Renal Project (CRP), Kobe 654-0142, Japan
3
Department of International Health, Graduate School of Health Science, Kobe University, Kobe 654-0142, Japan
4
Department of Rehabilitation, St. Marianna University School of Medicine Hospital, Kawasaki 216-8511, Japan
5
Department of Rehabilitation, St. Marianna University School of Medicine, Toyoko Hospital, Kawasaki, 211-0063, Japan
6
Department of Rare Diseases Research, Institute of Medical Science, St. Marianna University School of Medicine, Kawasaki 216-8511, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Omar Cauli
Diseases 2019, 7(1), 17; https://doi.org/10.3390/diseases7010017
Received: 26 December 2018 / Revised: 28 January 2019 / Accepted: 31 January 2019 / Published: 2 February 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neuro-psychiatric Disorders - from Diagnosis to Care)
Compared with elderly people who have not experienced falls, those who have were reported to have a shortened step length, large fluctuations in their pace, and a slow walking speed. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the step length required to maintain a walking speed of 1.0 m/s in patients aged 75 years or older. We measured the 10 m maximum walking speed in patients aged 75 years or older and divided them into the following two groups: Those who could walk 1.0 m/s or faster (fast group) and those who could not (slow group). Step length was determined from the number of steps taken during the 10 m-maximum walking speed test, and the step length-to-height ratio was calculated. Isometric knee extension muscle force (kgf), modified functional reach (cm), and one-leg standing time (s) were also measured. We included 261 patients (average age: 82.1 years, 50.6% men) in this study. The fast group included 119 participants, and the slow group included 142 participants. In a regression logistic analysis, knee extension muscle force (p = 0.03) and step length-to-height ratio (p < 0.01) were determined as factors significantly related to the fast group. As a result of ROC curve analysis, a step length-to-height ratio of 31.0% could discriminate between the two walking speed groups. The results suggest that the step length-to-height ratio required to maintain a walking speed of 1.0 m/s is 31.0% in patients aged 75 years or older. View Full-Text
Keywords: maximum walking speed; step length; elderly patients; muscle force maximum walking speed; step length; elderly patients; muscle force
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Morio, Y.; Izawa, K.P.; Omori, Y.; Katata, H.; Ishiyama, D.; Koyama, S.; Yamano, Y. The Relationship between Walking Speed and Step Length in Older Aged Patients. Diseases 2019, 7, 17.

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