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Systems, Volume 4, Issue 2 (June 2016) – 9 articles

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Open AccessArticle
Improved Time Response of Stabilization in Synchronization of Chaotic Oscillators Using Mathematica
Systems 2016, 4(2), 25; https://doi.org/10.3390/systems4020025 - 22 Jun 2016
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3410
Abstract
Chaotic dynamics are an interesting topic in nonlinear science that has been intensively studied during the last three decades due to its wide availability. Motivated by much researches on synchronization, the authors of this study have improved the time response of stabilization when [...] Read more.
Chaotic dynamics are an interesting topic in nonlinear science that has been intensively studied during the last three decades due to its wide availability. Motivated by much researches on synchronization, the authors of this study have improved the time response of stabilization when parametrically excited Φ6—Van der Pol Oscillator (VDPO) and Φ6—Duffing Oscillator (DO) are synchronized identically as well as non-identically (with each other) using the Linear Active Control (LAC) technique using Mathematica. Furthermore, the authors have synchronized the same pairs of the oscillators using a more robust synchronization with faster time response of stability called Robust Adaptive Sliding Mode Control (RASMC). A comparative study has been done between the previous results of Njah’s work and our results based on Mathematica via LAC. The time response of stabilization of synchronization using RASMC has been discussed. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Adaptation in E-Learning Content Specifications with Dynamic Sharable Objects
Systems 2016, 4(2), 24; https://doi.org/10.3390/systems4020024 - 08 Jun 2016
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 3798
Abstract
Dynamic sophisticated real-time adaptation is not possible with current e-learning technologies. Our proposal is based on changing the approach for the development of e-learning systems using dynamic languages and including them in both platforms and learning content specifications thereby making them adaptive. We [...] Read more.
Dynamic sophisticated real-time adaptation is not possible with current e-learning technologies. Our proposal is based on changing the approach for the development of e-learning systems using dynamic languages and including them in both platforms and learning content specifications thereby making them adaptive. We propose a Sharable Auto-Adaptive Learning Object (SALO), defined as an object that includes learning content and describes its own behaviour supported by dynamic languages. We describe an example implementation of SALO for the delivery and assessment of a web development course using Moodle rubrics. As a result, the learning objects can dynamically adapt their characteristics and behaviour in e-learning platforms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Adaptive Educational Technology Systems)
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Open AccessArticle
Model-Based Design and Formal Verification Processes for Automated Waterway System Operations
Systems 2016, 4(2), 23; https://doi.org/10.3390/systems4020023 - 07 Jun 2016
Viewed by 4750
Abstract
Waterway and canal systems are particularly cost effective in the transport of bulk and containerized goods to support global trade. Yet, despite these benefits, they are among the most under-appreciated forms of transportation engineering systems. Looking ahead, the long-term view is not rosy. [...] Read more.
Waterway and canal systems are particularly cost effective in the transport of bulk and containerized goods to support global trade. Yet, despite these benefits, they are among the most under-appreciated forms of transportation engineering systems. Looking ahead, the long-term view is not rosy. Failures, delays, incidents and accidents in aging waterway systems are doing little to attract the technical and economic assistance required for modernization and sustainability. In a step toward overcoming these challenges, this paper argues that programs for waterway and canal modernization and sustainability can benefit significantly from system thinking, supported by systems engineering techniques. We propose a multi-level multi-stage methodology for the model-based design, simulation and formal verification of automated waterway system operations. At the front-end of development, semi-formal modeling techniques are employed for the representation of project goals and scenarios, requirements and high-level models of behavior and structure. To assure the accuracy of engineering predictions and the correctness of operations, formal modeling techniques are used for the performance assessment and the formal verification of the correctness of functionality. The essential features of this methodology are highlighted in a case study examination of ship and lock-system behaviors in a two-stage lock system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Product, Process, System Design Review Methods and Tools)
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Open AccessArticle
A Classification of Adaptive Feedback in Educational Systems for Programming
Systems 2016, 4(2), 22; https://doi.org/10.3390/systems4020022 - 23 May 2016
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 3637
Abstract
Over the last three decades, many educational systems for programming have been developed to support learning/teaching programming. In this paper, feedback types that are supported by existing educational systems for programming are classified. In order to be able to provide feedback, educational systems [...] Read more.
Over the last three decades, many educational systems for programming have been developed to support learning/teaching programming. In this paper, feedback types that are supported by existing educational systems for programming are classified. In order to be able to provide feedback, educational systems for programming deployed various approaches to analyzing students’ programs. This paper identifies analysis approaches for programs and introduces a classification for adaptive feedback supported by educational systems for programming. The classification of feedback is the contribution of this paper. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Adaptive Educational Technology Systems)
Open AccessArticle
A Knowledge Comparison Environment for Supporting Meaningful Learning of E-Book Users
Systems 2016, 4(2), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/systems4020021 - 16 May 2016
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3393
Abstract
In this paper, we present an ontology-based visualization support system which can provide a meaningful learning environment to help e-book learners to effectively construct their knowledge frameworks. In this personalized visualization support system, learners are encouraged to actively locate new knowledge in their [...] Read more.
In this paper, we present an ontology-based visualization support system which can provide a meaningful learning environment to help e-book learners to effectively construct their knowledge frameworks. In this personalized visualization support system, learners are encouraged to actively locate new knowledge in their own knowledge framework and check the logical consistency of their ideas for clearing up misunderstandings; on the other hand, instructors will be able to decide the group distribution for collaborative learning activities based on the knowledge structure of learners. For facilitating those visualization supports, a method to semi-automatically construct a course-centered ontology to describe the required information in a map structure is presented. To automatically manipulate this course-centered ontology to provide visualization learning supports, a prototype system is designed and developed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Adaptive Educational Technology Systems)
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Open AccessArticle
Challenges and Success Factors of ERP Systems in Australian SMEs
Systems 2016, 4(2), 20; https://doi.org/10.3390/systems4020020 - 05 May 2016
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 7166
Abstract
Today, great potential is envisaged for ERP systems in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), and software vendors have been repackaging their ERP systems for SMEs with a recent focus on cloud-based systems. While cloud ERP offers the best solution for SMEs without the [...] Read more.
Today, great potential is envisaged for ERP systems in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), and software vendors have been repackaging their ERP systems for SMEs with a recent focus on cloud-based systems. While cloud ERP offers the best solution for SMEs without the overheads of the huge investment and management costs that are associated with traditional ERP systems, the SME sector faces many challenges in their adoption. Traditional ERP studies have predominantly focused on large organizations, and gaps in the literature indicate that both vendor and consumer perspectives require more understanding with new technology offerings for SMEs. This paper describes some of the common challenges, such as cost effectiveness, alignment between software and business processes, customized governance and training, which form the major SME constraints for ERP system adoption. Due to the dynamic nature of SME businesses, best practice guidelines for an SME’s ERP implementation could be arrived at through closer investigation of its business requirements in order to avoid misfits. This forms the main objective of the study. We identify key success factors of ERP implementation in an Australian SME as a case study. These target success factors are then compared to the actual outcomes achieved. Factors such as business process alignment with the ERP system, meeting customer and stakeholder needs and reducing recurring and maintenance costs were key to the success of ERP implementation for the Australian SME. In particular, the IT and business strategy alignment with a customer focus and flexible reporting features of ERP systems has resulted in business agility. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Enterprise Resource Planning Systems)
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Open AccessArticle
Three Scales of Acephalous Organization
Systems 2016, 4(2), 19; https://doi.org/10.3390/systems4020019 - 07 Apr 2016
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3358
Abstract
Dominance-based hierarchies have been taken for granted as the way we structure our organizations, but they are a part of a paradigm that has put our whole existence in peril. There is an urgent need to explore alternative paradigms that take us away [...] Read more.
Dominance-based hierarchies have been taken for granted as the way we structure our organizations, but they are a part of a paradigm that has put our whole existence in peril. There is an urgent need to explore alternative paradigms that take us away from dystopic futures towards preferred, life enhancing paradigms based on wellbeing. One of the alternative ways of organizing ourselves that avoids much of the structural violence of existing organizations is the acephalous group (operating without any structured, ongoing leadership). Decision making becomes distributed, transitory and self-selecting. Such groups are not always appropriate and have their strengths and weaknesses, but they can be a more effective, humane way of organizing ourselves and can open windows to new ways of being. Acephalous groups operate at many different scales and adapt their structure accordingly. For this reason, a comparison of small, medium and large-scale acephalous groups reveals some of the dynamics involved in acephalous functioning and provides a useful overview of these emergent forms of organization and foreshadows the role they may play in future. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Systems of Interaction between the First Sedentary Villages in the Near East Exposed Using Agent-Based Modelling of Obsidian Exchange
Systems 2016, 4(2), 18; https://doi.org/10.3390/systems4020018 - 23 Mar 2016
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 3465
Abstract
In the Near East, nomadic hunter-gatherer societies became sedentary farmers for the first time during the transition into the Neolithic. Sedentary life presented a risk of isolation for Neolithic groups. As fluid intergroup interactions are crucial for the sharing of information, resources and [...] Read more.
In the Near East, nomadic hunter-gatherer societies became sedentary farmers for the first time during the transition into the Neolithic. Sedentary life presented a risk of isolation for Neolithic groups. As fluid intergroup interactions are crucial for the sharing of information, resources and genes, Neolithic villages developed a network of contacts. In this paper we study obsidian exchange between Neolithic villages in order to characterize this network of interaction. Using agent-based modelling and elements taken from complex network theory, we model obsidian exchange and compare results with archaeological data. We demonstrate that complex networks of interaction were established at the outset of the Neolithic and hypothesize that the existence of these complex networks was a necessary condition for the success and spread of a new way of living. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agent-Based Modelling of City Systems)
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Open AccessArticle
A Possibilistic Approach for Aggregating Customer Opinions in Product Development
Systems 2016, 4(2), 17; https://doi.org/10.3390/systems4020017 - 23 Mar 2016
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3638
Abstract
One of the major tasks of product development is to collect the opinions of potential customers and to then find out the status of certain product features. The status of a product feature means whether or not it must, should, or could be [...] Read more.
One of the major tasks of product development is to collect the opinions of potential customers and to then find out the status of certain product features. The status of a product feature means whether or not it must, should, or could be included in the product, or even avoided. In doing so, a simple relative frequency-based computing approach is not sufficient. Rather, a logical computing approach is a better option. Based on this contemplation, this study describes a methodology to identify the status of a product feature in terms of must-be, should-be, or could-be categories, where the collected customer opinions are computed using a logical approach. Possibility distributions (i.e., fuzzy numbers) play a significant role in the logical computation. A Kano-model-based questionnaire is employed to collect the customer opinions. Through a case study, it is demonstrated that the proposed approach is effective in dealing with both the subjectivity and controversy that the customer opinions may exhibit. The results of this study are useful for making decisions in the early stage of a product development process in a lucid manner. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Product, Process, System Design Review Methods and Tools)
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