Next Article in Journal
Loss of Class III Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase Vps34 Results in Cone Degeneration
Previous Article in Journal
Antimicrobial Activity of Chrysoeriol 7 and Chochlioquinone 9, White-Backed Planthopper-Resistant Compounds, Against Rice Pathogenic Strains
Open AccessArticle

Acute Physiological Responses to High-Intensity Resistance Circuit Training vs. Traditional Strength Training in Soccer Players

1
Research Center for High Performance Sport, Catholic University of Murcia, 30107 Murcia, Spain
2
Centre for Exercise and Sports Science Research, School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, 6027 Joondalup, Australia
3
Faculty of Sport Science, Catholic University of Murcia, 30107 Murcia, Spain
4
NAR-Nucleus of High Performance in Sport, São Paulo 04753060, Brazil
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Biology 2020, 9(11), 383; https://doi.org/10.3390/biology9110383
Received: 29 September 2020 / Revised: 29 October 2020 / Accepted: 5 November 2020 / Published: 7 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Physiology)
Strength training is a key factor for soccer players, but at amateur levels, it is difficult to apply due to the lack of infrastructure and short training time. In this regard, high-intensity resistance circuit-based training could be a suitable method to solve these issues. Circuit training can improve the cardiorespiratory and metabolic responses while reducing training time by 66%. The effects of circuit training could contribute to improving aerobic fitness and body composition in soccer players.
The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the cardiorespiratory and metabolic responses induced by high-intensity resistance circuit-based (HRC) and traditional strength (TS) training protocols. Ten amateur soccer players reported to the laboratory on four occasions: (1) protocol familiarization and load determination; (2) maximal oxygen consumption test; (3) and (4) resistance training protocols (HRC and TS), completed in a cross-over randomized order. In both protocols, the same structure was used (two blocks of 3 sets × 3 exercises, separated by a 5-min rest), with only the time between consecutive exercises differing: TS (3 min) and HRC (~35 s, allowing 3 min of local recovery). To test for between-protocol differences, paired t-tests were applied. Results showed that oxygen consumption and heart rate during HRC were 75% and 39% higher than TS, respectively (p < 0.001). After the training sessions, blood lactate concentration at 1.5, 5 and 7 min and excess post-exercise oxygen consumption were higher in HRC. The respiratory exchange ratio was 6.7% greater during HRC, with no between-group differences found post-exercise. The energy cost of HRC was ~66% higher than TS. In conclusion, HRC training induces greater cardiorespiratory and metabolic responses in soccer players and thus may be a time-effective training strategy. View Full-Text
Keywords: aerobic fitness; muscle strength; oxygen uptake; heart rate; football aerobic fitness; muscle strength; oxygen uptake; heart rate; football
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Marín-Pagán, C.; Blazevich, A.J.; Chung, L.H.; Romero-Arenas, S.; Freitas, T.T.; Alcaraz, P.E. Acute Physiological Responses to High-Intensity Resistance Circuit Training vs. Traditional Strength Training in Soccer Players. Biology 2020, 9, 383. https://doi.org/10.3390/biology9110383

AMA Style

Marín-Pagán C, Blazevich AJ, Chung LH, Romero-Arenas S, Freitas TT, Alcaraz PE. Acute Physiological Responses to High-Intensity Resistance Circuit Training vs. Traditional Strength Training in Soccer Players. Biology. 2020; 9(11):383. https://doi.org/10.3390/biology9110383

Chicago/Turabian Style

Marín-Pagán, Cristian; Blazevich, Anthony J.; Chung, Linda H.; Romero-Arenas, Salvador; Freitas, Tomás T.; Alcaraz, Pedro E. 2020. "Acute Physiological Responses to High-Intensity Resistance Circuit Training vs. Traditional Strength Training in Soccer Players" Biology 9, no. 11: 383. https://doi.org/10.3390/biology9110383

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop