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Feasibility and Surface Evaluation of the Pigment from Scytalidium cuboideum for Inkjet Printing on Textiles

1
Department of Wood Science and Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA
2
School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA
3
Department of Integrative Biology, School of Life Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA
4
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Rutgers University, 98 Brett Rd., Piscataway Township, NJ 08854, USA
5
College of Business, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA
6
Department of Chemical engineering, College of Science, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Coatings 2019, 9(4), 266; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings9040266
Received: 28 February 2019 / Revised: 5 April 2019 / Accepted: 17 April 2019 / Published: 19 April 2019
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Abstract

Textile inkjet printing is an increasingly popular process in the textile industry, as it allows for the incorporation of complex and detailed patterns onto fabrics, as well as the production of small and medium volumes of printed text. Unfortunately, most of the dyes used by the textile industry come from synthetic and/or non-renewable sources. There has been some research to date in using fungal pigments from wood rotting fungi (‘spalting’ fungi) as textile dyes, however these have never been tested in inkjet printing. Of particular interest is the red crystallizing pigment from Scytalidium cuboideum, which has previously shown exceptional stability on textiles. To test this pigment in an inkjet setting, cotton and polyester fabrics were printed with three different ink formulations involving the red pigment: hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), ethanol, and acetone. The CTAB and ethanol-based ink formulations formed a ‘mesh-like’ structure on the surface of the cotton and polyester fibers, and turned the fabric purple. Acetone formulas formed crystal structures on the surface and turned the fabric red. These results show promise for turning the red pigment of S. cuboideum into an environmentally friendly, inkjet colorant, however further research is required to evaluate the crocking and explain the crystallization differences between inks. View Full-Text
Keywords: inkjet textile printing; spalting; fungus crystals; textile dyeing inkjet textile printing; spalting; fungus crystals; textile dyeing
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Vega Gutierrez, S.M.; He, Y.; Cao, Y.; Stone, D.; Walsh, Z.; Malhotra, R.; Chen, H.-L.; Chang, C.-H.; Robinson, S.C. Feasibility and Surface Evaluation of the Pigment from Scytalidium cuboideum for Inkjet Printing on Textiles. Coatings 2019, 9, 266.

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