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Article

The Effect of Argon as Atomization Gas on the Microstructure, Machine Hammer Peening Post-Treatment, and Corrosion Behavior of Twin Wire Arc Sprayed (TWAS) ZnAl4 Coatings

1
Institute of Materials Engineering, TU Dortmund University, Leonhard-Euler-Str. 2, 44227 Dortmund, Germany
2
Institute of Machining Technology, TU Dortmund University, Baroper Str. 303, 44227 Dortmund, Germany
3
Institute of Materials Test Engineering, TU Dortmund University, Baroper Str. 303, 44227 Dortmund, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Wolfgang Tillmann is chair of Materials Engineering; Frank Walther is chair of Materials Test Engineering.
Academic Editor: Ludmila B. Boinovich
Coatings 2022, 12(1), 32; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings12010032
Received: 27 November 2021 / Revised: 21 December 2021 / Accepted: 23 December 2021 / Published: 27 December 2021
In the twin wire arc spraying (TWAS) process, it is common to use compressed air as atomizing gas. Nitrogen or argon also are used to reduce oxidation and improve coating performance. The heat required to melt the feedstock material depends on the electrical conductivity of the wires used and the ionization energy of both the feedstock material and atomization gas. In the case of ZnAl4, no phase changes were recorded in the obtained coatings by using either compressed air or argon as atomization gas. This fact has led to the assumption that the melting behavior of ZnAl4 with its low melting and evaporating temperature is different from materials with a higher melting point, such as Fe and Ni, which also explains the unexpected compressive residual stresses in the as-sprayed conditions. The heavier atomization gas, argon, led to slightly higher compressive stresses and oxide content. Compressed air as atomization gas led to lower porosity, decreased surface roughness, and better corrosion resistance. In the case of argon, Al precipitated in the form of small particles. The post-treatment machine hammer peening (MHP) has induced horizontal cracks in compressed air sprayed coatings. These cracks were mainly initiated in the oxidized Al phase. View Full-Text
Keywords: twin wire arc spraying process; atomization gas; argon; ZnAl4 coatings; oxidation; machine hammer peening; corrosion behavior twin wire arc spraying process; atomization gas; argon; ZnAl4 coatings; oxidation; machine hammer peening; corrosion behavior
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MDPI and ACS Style

Tillmann, W.; Abdulgader, M.; Wirtz, A.; Milz, M.P.; Biermann, D.; Walther, F. The Effect of Argon as Atomization Gas on the Microstructure, Machine Hammer Peening Post-Treatment, and Corrosion Behavior of Twin Wire Arc Sprayed (TWAS) ZnAl4 Coatings. Coatings 2022, 12, 32. https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings12010032

AMA Style

Tillmann W, Abdulgader M, Wirtz A, Milz MP, Biermann D, Walther F. The Effect of Argon as Atomization Gas on the Microstructure, Machine Hammer Peening Post-Treatment, and Corrosion Behavior of Twin Wire Arc Sprayed (TWAS) ZnAl4 Coatings. Coatings. 2022; 12(1):32. https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings12010032

Chicago/Turabian Style

Tillmann, Wolfgang, Mohamed Abdulgader, Andreas Wirtz, Michael P. Milz, Dirk Biermann, and Frank Walther. 2022. "The Effect of Argon as Atomization Gas on the Microstructure, Machine Hammer Peening Post-Treatment, and Corrosion Behavior of Twin Wire Arc Sprayed (TWAS) ZnAl4 Coatings" Coatings 12, no. 1: 32. https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings12010032

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