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Article

Composition, Structure and Mechanical Properties of Industrially Sputtered Ta–B–C Coatings

1
Department of Physical Electronics, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 61137 Brno, Czech Republic
2
Institute of Technical Physics and Materials Science, Center for Energy Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Konkoly Thege M. út 29-33, H-1121 Budapest, Hungary
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Coatings 2020, 10(9), 853; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings10090853
Received: 14 July 2020 / Revised: 7 August 2020 / Accepted: 25 August 2020 / Published: 31 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Thin Film Coatings for Multifunctional Applications)
Ta–B–C coatings were non-reactively sputter-deposited in an industrial batch coater from a single segmented rotating cylindrical cathode employing a combinatorial approach. The chemical composition, morphology, microstructure, mechanical properties, and fracture resistance of the coatings were investigated. Their mechanical properties were linked to their microstructure and phase composition. Coatings placed stationary in front of the racetrack of the target and those performing a 1-axis rotation around the substrate carousel are compared. Utilization of the substrate rotation has no significant effect on the chemical composition of the coatings deposited at the same position compared to the cathode. Whereas the morphology of coatings with corresponding chemical composition is similar for stationary as well as rotating samples, the rotating coatings exhibit a distinct multilayered structure with a repetition period in the range of nanometers despite utilizing a non-reactive process and a single sputter source. All the coatings are either amorphous, nanocomposite or nanocrystalline depending on their chemical composition. The presence of TaC, TaB, and/or TaB2 phases is identified. The crystallite size is typically less than 5 nm. The highest hardness of the coatings is associated with the presence of larger grains in a nanocomposite structure or formation of polycrystalline coatings. The number, density, and length of cracks observed after high-load indentation is on par with current optimized commercially available protective coatings. View Full-Text
Keywords: magnetron sputtering; industrial process; segmented target; TaBC; phase composition; structure; mechanical properties magnetron sputtering; industrial process; segmented target; TaBC; phase composition; structure; mechanical properties
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kroker, M.; Souček, P.; Matej, P.; Zábranský, L.; Czigány, Z.; Balázsi, K.; Vašina, P. Composition, Structure and Mechanical Properties of Industrially Sputtered Ta–B–C Coatings. Coatings 2020, 10, 853. https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings10090853

AMA Style

Kroker M, Souček P, Matej P, Zábranský L, Czigány Z, Balázsi K, Vašina P. Composition, Structure and Mechanical Properties of Industrially Sputtered Ta–B–C Coatings. Coatings. 2020; 10(9):853. https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings10090853

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kroker, Michael, Pavel Souček, Pavol Matej, Lukáš Zábranský, Zsolt Czigány, Katalin Balázsi, and Petr Vašina. 2020. "Composition, Structure and Mechanical Properties of Industrially Sputtered Ta–B–C Coatings" Coatings 10, no. 9: 853. https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings10090853

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