Next Article in Journal
The Basis for Natural Multiresistance to Phage in Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Next Article in Special Issue
Clinical Findings and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Anaerobic Bacteria Isolated in Bloodstream Infections
Previous Article in Journal
Stilbenoids: A Natural Arsenal against Bacterial Pathogens
 
 
Article

Breast Abscesses Caused by Anaerobic Microorganisms: Clinical and Microbiological Characteristics

Department of Microbiology and Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.GRANADA, University Hospital Virgen de las Nieves, 18014 Granada, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Antibiotics 2020, 9(6), 341; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics9060341
Received: 30 April 2020 / Revised: 4 June 2020 / Accepted: 16 June 2020 / Published: 18 June 2020
The objectives of this study were to report the antimicrobial susceptibility of 35 clinically significant anaerobic bacteria isolated from breast abscesses between March 2017 and February 2020 in a tertiary hospital in Granada (Spain) and to describe key clinical features of the patients. Species identification was performed mainly by MALDI-TOF MS. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests were carried out against benzylpenicillin, amoxicillin–clavulanic acid, imipenem, moxifloxacin, clindamycin, metronidazole, and piperacillin–tazobactam using the gradient diffusion technique and European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing EUCAST breakpoints (except for moxifloxacin). The most frequent anaerobes were Finegoldia magna (31.4%; n = 11), Actinomyces spp. (17.1%; n = 6), Propionibacterium spp. (17.1%; n = 6), and Prevotella spp. (14.2%; n = 5). Imipenem, amoxicillin–clavulanic acid, and piperacillin–tazobactam were universally active against all genera tested. High overall resistance rates to clindamycin were observed, especially for Gram-positive anaerobic cocci (56.2%) and Gram-positive anaerobic bacilli (38.4%). High resistance rates to metronidazole were also observed for Gram-positive (76.9%) and Gram-negative anaerobic bacilli (50%). High resistance rates to moxifloxacin were found for Gram-negative anaerobic bacilli (50%) and Gram-positive anaerobic cocci (31.2%). No breast abscess cases of Bacteroides spp. were detected. Routine antimicrobial susceptibility testing for anaerobes in breast abscesses may contribute to allow empirical therapies to be selected in accordance with local data on resistant strains. View Full-Text
Keywords: anaerobes; breast abscesses; MALDI-TOF MS; antibiotics; bacteria anaerobes; breast abscesses; MALDI-TOF MS; antibiotics; bacteria
MDPI and ACS Style

Cobo, F.; Guillot, V.; Navarro-Marí, J.M. Breast Abscesses Caused by Anaerobic Microorganisms: Clinical and Microbiological Characteristics. Antibiotics 2020, 9, 341. https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics9060341

AMA Style

Cobo F, Guillot V, Navarro-Marí JM. Breast Abscesses Caused by Anaerobic Microorganisms: Clinical and Microbiological Characteristics. Antibiotics. 2020; 9(6):341. https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics9060341

Chicago/Turabian Style

Cobo, Fernando, Vicente Guillot, and José María Navarro-Marí. 2020. "Breast Abscesses Caused by Anaerobic Microorganisms: Clinical and Microbiological Characteristics" Antibiotics 9, no. 6: 341. https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics9060341

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop