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Article

Is Blood a Good Indicator for Detecting Antimicrobials in Meat? Evidence for the Development of In Vivo Surveillance Methods

1
Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón-IA2 (Universidad de Zaragoza-CITA), 50013 Zaragoza, Spain
2
Public Health Laboratory, Office of Public Health and Addictions, Ministry of Health of the Basque Government, 20013 Guipuzkoa, Spain
3
INTHERES, Université de Toulouse, INRA, ENVT, 31300 Toulouse, France
4
Department of R&D, ZEULAB S.L., 50197 Zaragoza, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Antibiotics 2020, 9(4), 175; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics9040175
Received: 1 March 2020 / Revised: 28 March 2020 / Accepted: 10 April 2020 / Published: 12 April 2020
The introduction of antimicrobial residues in the food chain has a significant impact on human health. An innovative solution to avoid their presence in meat is the adaptation of current control methods for use with in vivo matrixes. Thus, the aim was to obtain paired blood and muscle samples from pigs treated with some of the main antimicrobials currently used in veterinary medicine (oxytetracycline, sulfamethoxypyridazine, enrofloxacin, amoxicillin), and to compare their rate of depletion in both matrixes. Antimicrobial concentrations in paired samples of blood and muscle were determined by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS) or high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (HPLC-FLD). A comparison between values obtained in muscle and blood showed a similar distribution in both matrixes for oxytetracycline; for sulfamethoxypyridazine, a similar decrease rate but a concentration three times higher in blood compared to muscle was found; for enrofloxacin, we found significant differences in the rate of depletion, with similar antimicrobial concentrations in both matrixes with values close to the maximum residue limit (MRL) and higher amounts in muscle for values that lay considerably over the MRL. Conversely, amoxicillin depletion was so rapid that its appearance in carcasses does not seem to pose a risk. Therefore, blood would be a feasible matrix for the development of new in vivo tests. View Full-Text
Keywords: antibiotic; sulfonamide; quinolone; HPLC-FLD; LC–MS/MS; meat; blood antibiotic; sulfonamide; quinolone; HPLC-FLD; LC–MS/MS; meat; blood
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MDPI and ACS Style

Serrano, M.J.; Mitjana, O.; Bonastre, C.; Laborda, A.; Falceto, M.V.; García-Gonzalo, D.; Abilleira, E.; Elorduy, J.; Bousquet-Melou, A.; Mata, L.; Condón, S.; Pagán, R. Is Blood a Good Indicator for Detecting Antimicrobials in Meat? Evidence for the Development of In Vivo Surveillance Methods. Antibiotics 2020, 9, 175. https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics9040175

AMA Style

Serrano MJ, Mitjana O, Bonastre C, Laborda A, Falceto MV, García-Gonzalo D, Abilleira E, Elorduy J, Bousquet-Melou A, Mata L, Condón S, Pagán R. Is Blood a Good Indicator for Detecting Antimicrobials in Meat? Evidence for the Development of In Vivo Surveillance Methods. Antibiotics. 2020; 9(4):175. https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics9040175

Chicago/Turabian Style

Serrano, María Jesús, Olga Mitjana, Cristina Bonastre, Alicia Laborda, María Victoria Falceto, Diego García-Gonzalo, Eunate Abilleira, Janire Elorduy, Alain Bousquet-Melou, Luis Mata, Santiago Condón, and Rafael Pagán. 2020. "Is Blood a Good Indicator for Detecting Antimicrobials in Meat? Evidence for the Development of In Vivo Surveillance Methods" Antibiotics 9, no. 4: 175. https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics9040175

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