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Sustained Local Delivery of Diclofenac from Three-Dimensional Ultrafine Fibrous Protein Scaffolds with Ultrahigh Drug Loading Capacity

1
Key Laboratory of Textile Science &Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Textiles, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620, China
2
Engineering Research Center of Technical Textiles, College of Textiles, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620, China
3
Center for Incubation Innovation Research and Consultancy, Jyothy Institute of Technology, Thatguni post Bengaluru 560082, India
4
Donghua University Center for Civil Aviation Composites, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620, China
5
College of Textiles and Apparel, Quanzhou Normal University, Fujian 362000, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(7), 918; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9070918
Received: 26 May 2019 / Revised: 15 June 2019 / Accepted: 18 June 2019 / Published: 26 June 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Multifunctional Nanocarriers for Drug Delivery)
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Abstract

The three-dimensional (3D) ultrafine fibrous scaffolds loaded with functional components can not only provide support to 3D tissue repair, but also deliver the components in-situ with small dosage and low fusion frequency. However, the conventional loading methods possess drawbacks such as low loading capacity or high burst release. In this research, an ultralow concentration phase separation (ULCPS) technique was developed to form 3D ultrafine gelatin fibers and, meanwhile, load an anti-inflammatory drug, diclofenac, with high capacities for the long-term delivery. The developed scaffolds could achieve a maximum drug loading capacity of 12 wt.% and a highest drug loading efficiency of 84% while maintaining their 3D ultrafine fibrous structure with high specific pore volumes from 227.9 to 237.19 cm3/mg. The initial release at the first hour could be reduced from 34.7% to 42.2%, and a sustained linear release profile was observed with a rate of about 1% per day in the following 30 days. The diclofenac loaded in and released from the ULCPS scaffolds could keep its therapeutic molecular structure. The cell viability has not been affected by the release of drug when the loading was less than 12 wt.%. The results proved the possibility to develop various 3D ultrafine fibrous scaffolds, which can supply functional components in-situ with a long-term. View Full-Text
Keywords: sustained local drug delivery; ultrahigh loading capacity; controlled drug release; three-dimensional ultrafine fibrous scaffold; phase separation sustained local drug delivery; ultrahigh loading capacity; controlled drug release; three-dimensional ultrafine fibrous scaffold; phase separation
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Hasan, S.M.K.; Li, R.; Wang, Y.; Reddy, N.; Liu, W.; Qiu, Y.; Jiang, Q. Sustained Local Delivery of Diclofenac from Three-Dimensional Ultrafine Fibrous Protein Scaffolds with Ultrahigh Drug Loading Capacity. Nanomaterials 2019, 9, 918.

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