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Article

Inverse ISAsomes in Bio-Compatible Oils—Exploring Formulations in Squalane, Triolein and Olive Oil

Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Technical Chemistry, Chemical and Process Engineering, Biotechnology, Graz University of Technology, Stremayrgasse 9, 8010 Graz, Austria
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Current address: Institute for Ion Physics and Applied Physics, Faculty of Mathematics, Computer Science and Physics, University of Innsbruck, Technikerstraße 25, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria.
Academic Editor: Angelina Angelova
Nanomaterials 2022, 12(7), 1133; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano12071133
Received: 12 January 2022 / Revised: 26 March 2022 / Accepted: 28 March 2022 / Published: 29 March 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Self-Assembly, Synthetic and Biomimetic Nanostructures)
In contrast to their more common counterparts in aqueous solutions, inverse ISAsomes (internally self-assembled somes/particles) are formulated as kinetically stabilised dispersions of hydrophilic, lyotropic liquid-crystalline (LC) phases in non-polar oils. This contribution reports on their formation in bio-compatible oils. We found that it is possible to create inverse hexosomes, inverse micellar cubosomes (Fd3m) and an inverse emulsified microemulsion (EME) in excess squalane with a polyethylene glycol alkyl ether as the primary surfactant forming the LC phase and to stabilise them with hydrophobised silica nanoparticles. Furthermore, an emulsified L1-phase and inverse hexosomes were formed in excess triolein with the triblock-copolymer Pluronic® P94 as the primary surfactant. Stabilisation was achieved with a molecular stabiliser of type polyethylene glycol (PEG)-dipolyhydroxystearate. For the inverse hexosomes in triolein, the possibility of a formulation without any additional stabiliser was explored. It was found that a sufficiently strong stabilisation effect was created by the primary surfactant alone. Finally, triolein was replaced with olive oil which also led to the successful formation of inverse hexosomes. As far as we know, there exists no previous contribution about inverse ISAsomes in complex oils such as triolein or plant oils, and the existence of stabiliser-free (i.e., self-stabilising) inverse hexosomes has also not been reported until now. View Full-Text
Keywords: ISAsomes; inverse cubosomes; inverse hexosomes; self-assembly; nanostructures ISAsomes; inverse cubosomes; inverse hexosomes; self-assembly; nanostructures
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MDPI and ACS Style

Trummer, F.; Glatter, O.; Chemelli, A. Inverse ISAsomes in Bio-Compatible Oils—Exploring Formulations in Squalane, Triolein and Olive Oil. Nanomaterials 2022, 12, 1133. https://doi.org/10.3390/nano12071133

AMA Style

Trummer F, Glatter O, Chemelli A. Inverse ISAsomes in Bio-Compatible Oils—Exploring Formulations in Squalane, Triolein and Olive Oil. Nanomaterials. 2022; 12(7):1133. https://doi.org/10.3390/nano12071133

Chicago/Turabian Style

Trummer, Florian, Otto Glatter, and Angela Chemelli. 2022. "Inverse ISAsomes in Bio-Compatible Oils—Exploring Formulations in Squalane, Triolein and Olive Oil" Nanomaterials 12, no. 7: 1133. https://doi.org/10.3390/nano12071133

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