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Article

New Phenotype and Mineralization of Biogenic Iron Oxide in Magnetotactic Bacteria

1
Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg (IPCMS), University of Strasbourg, 23 rue du Loess BP 43, CEDEX 2, 67034 Strasbourg, France
2
National Institute of Materials Physics, Atomistilor 405A, 077125 Magurele, Romania
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Instituto de Microbiologia Paulo de Góes, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Avenida Carlos Chagas Filho, 373, CCS, UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro 21941-902, Brazil
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Institut de Science des Matériaux de Mulhouse, University of Haute Alsace, 68057 Mulhouse, France
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Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro 21941-902, Brazil
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Centro Brasiliero de Pesquisas Fisicas, LABNANO, Rio de Janeiro 22290-180, Brazil
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Helmut Cölfen
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(12), 3189; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11123189
Received: 20 October 2021 / Revised: 22 November 2021 / Accepted: 23 November 2021 / Published: 25 November 2021
Many magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) biomineralize magnetite crystals that nucleate and grow inside intracellular membranous vesicles originating from invaginations of the cytoplasmic membrane. The crystals together with their surrounding membranes are referred to as magnetosomes. Magnetosome magnetite crystals nucleate and grow using iron transported inside the vesicle by specific proteins. Here, we tackle the question of the organization of magnetosomes, which are always described as constituted by linear chains of nanocrystals. In addition, it is commonly accepted that the iron oxide nanocrystals are in the magnetite-based phase. We show, in the case of a wild species of coccus-type bacterium, that there is a double organization of the magnetosomes, relatively perpendicular to each other, and that the nanocrystals are in fact maghemite. These findings were obtained, respectively, by using electron tomography of whole mounts of cells directly from the environment and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and diffraction. Structure simulations were performed with the MacTempas software. This study opens new perspectives on the diversity of phenotypes within MTBs and allows to envisage other mechanisms of nucleation and formation of biogenic iron oxide crystals. View Full-Text
Keywords: magnetotactic bacteria; phenotype; magnetite; maghemite; electron microscopy; EDS; electron tomography; high-resolution imaging magnetotactic bacteria; phenotype; magnetite; maghemite; electron microscopy; EDS; electron tomography; high-resolution imaging
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MDPI and ACS Style

Baaziz, W.; Ghica, C.; Cypriano, J.; Abreu, F.; Anselme, K.; Ersen, O.; Farina, M.; Werckmann, J. New Phenotype and Mineralization of Biogenic Iron Oxide in Magnetotactic Bacteria. Nanomaterials 2021, 11, 3189. https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11123189

AMA Style

Baaziz W, Ghica C, Cypriano J, Abreu F, Anselme K, Ersen O, Farina M, Werckmann J. New Phenotype and Mineralization of Biogenic Iron Oxide in Magnetotactic Bacteria. Nanomaterials. 2021; 11(12):3189. https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11123189

Chicago/Turabian Style

Baaziz, Walid, Corneliu Ghica, Jefferson Cypriano, Fernanda Abreu, Karine Anselme, Ovidiu Ersen, Marcos Farina, and Jacques Werckmann. 2021. "New Phenotype and Mineralization of Biogenic Iron Oxide in Magnetotactic Bacteria" Nanomaterials 11, no. 12: 3189. https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11123189

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