Next Article in Journal
Glass Ionomer Cements for the Restoration of Non-Carious Cervical Lesions in the Geriatric Patient
Next Article in Special Issue
Tissue Engineering Scaffolds Fabricated in Dissolvable 3D-Printed Molds for Patient-Specific Craniofacial Bone Regeneration
Previous Article in Journal
Genipin-Enhanced Fibrin Hydrogel and Novel Silk for Intervertebral Disc Repair in a Loaded Bovine Organ Culture Model
Previous Article in Special Issue
Recent Advances in Biomaterials for 3D Printing and Tissue Engineering
Article Menu
Issue 3 (September) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
J. Funct. Biomater. 2018, 9(3), 41; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfb9030041

Implementation of Industrial Additive Manufacturing: Intelligent Implants and Drug Delivery Systems

1
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aalto University, 02150 Espoo, Finland
2
Department of Otorhinolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, 00029 Helsinki, Finland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 31 May 2018 / Revised: 26 June 2018 / Accepted: 27 June 2018 / Published: 29 June 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 3D Printing of Biomaterials)
Full-Text   |   PDF [10312 KB, uploaded 29 June 2018]   |  

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the ability of additive manufacturing, also known as 3D printing, to produce effective drug delivery devices and implants that are both identifiable, as well as traceable. Drug delivery devices can potentially be used for drug release in the direct vicinity of target tissues or the selected medication route in a patient-specific manner as required. The identification and traceability of additively manufactured implants can be administered through radiofrequency identification systems. The focus of this study is to explore how embedded medication and sensors can be added in different additive manufacturing processes. The concept is extended to biomaterials with the help of the literature. As a result of this study, a patient-specific drug delivery device can be custom-designed and additively manufactured in the form of an implant that can identify, trace, and dispense a drug to the vicinity of a selected target tissue as a patient-specific function of time for bodily treatment and restoration. View Full-Text
Keywords: additive manufacturing; 3D printing; biomaterials; parametric modeling; drug delivery systems; embedding; medicine; radiofrequency identification; object memory; internet of things additive manufacturing; 3D printing; biomaterials; parametric modeling; drug delivery systems; embedding; medicine; radiofrequency identification; object memory; internet of things
Figures

Graphical abstract

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Akmal, J.S.; Salmi, M.; Mäkitie, A.; Björkstrand, R.; Partanen, J. Implementation of Industrial Additive Manufacturing: Intelligent Implants and Drug Delivery Systems. J. Funct. Biomater. 2018, 9, 41.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
J. Funct. Biomater. EISSN 2079-4983 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top