Next Article in Journal / Special Issue
A Reappraisal of the Threshold Hypothesis of Creativity and Intelligence
Previous Article in Journal
Effect Sizes, Power, and Biases in Intelligence Research: A Meta-Meta-Analysis
Previous Article in Special Issue
The Contribution of Executive Functions in Predicting Mathematical Creativity in Typical Elementary School Classes: A Twofold Role for Updating
Article

The Influence of Situational Cues on Children’s Creativity in an Alternative Uses Task and the Moderating Effect of Selective Attention

1
Department of Pedagogy and Education: Development & Education of Youth in Diverse Societies, Utrecht University, Heidelberglaan 1, 3584CS Utrecht, The Netherlands
2
Department of Language and Culture, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, P.O. Box 6050 Langnes, NO-9037 Tromsø, Norway
3
Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University, P.O. Box 9104, 6500 HE Nijmegen, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 3 June 2020 / Revised: 11 October 2020 / Accepted: 12 October 2020 / Published: 19 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Intelligence and Creativity)
Taking a perception-action perspective, we investigated how the presence of different real objects in children’s immediate situation affected their creativity and whether this effect was moderated by their selective attention. Seventy children between ages 9 and 12 years old participated. Verbal responses on a visual Alternative Uses Task with a low stimulus and high stimulus condition were coded on fluency, flexibility, and originality. Selective attention was measured with a visual search task. Results showed that fluency was not affected by stimulus condition and was unrelated to selective attention. Flexibility was positively associated with selective attention. Originality, net of fluency and flexibility, showed a main effect of stimulus condition in an unexpected direction, as children gave more original responses in the low stimulus condition compared to the high stimulus condition. A significant moderation effect revealed that children with better selective attention skills benefitted from a low stimulus environment, whereas children with weaker selective attention performed better in a high stimulus environment. The findings demonstrate differential effects of the immediate situation and selective attention, and support the hypothesis that creativity is impacted by immediate situation and selective attention, yet in unexpected ways. View Full-Text
Keywords: creativity; stimulus environment; immediate situation; selective attention; perception–action perspective; affordances creativity; stimulus environment; immediate situation; selective attention; perception–action perspective; affordances
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

van Dijk, M.; Blom, E.; Kroesbergen, E.H.; Leseman, P.P.M. The Influence of Situational Cues on Children’s Creativity in an Alternative Uses Task and the Moderating Effect of Selective Attention. J. Intell. 2020, 8, 37. https://doi.org/10.3390/jintelligence8040037

AMA Style

van Dijk M, Blom E, Kroesbergen EH, Leseman PPM. The Influence of Situational Cues on Children’s Creativity in an Alternative Uses Task and the Moderating Effect of Selective Attention. Journal of Intelligence. 2020; 8(4):37. https://doi.org/10.3390/jintelligence8040037

Chicago/Turabian Style

van Dijk, Marloes, Elma Blom, Evelyn H. Kroesbergen, and Paul P.M. Leseman. 2020. "The Influence of Situational Cues on Children’s Creativity in an Alternative Uses Task and the Moderating Effect of Selective Attention" Journal of Intelligence 8, no. 4: 37. https://doi.org/10.3390/jintelligence8040037

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop