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The Relation of Personality and Intelligence—What Can the Brunswik Symmetry Principle Tell Us?

1
Hector Research Institute of Education Sciences and Psychology, University of Tübingen, Europastraße 6, 72072 Tübingen, Germany
2
Institute of Psychology, Heidelberg University, Hauptstrasse 47-51, D-69117 Heidelberg, Germany
3
Department of Psychology, Technical University Dortmund, Emil-Figge-Straße 50, 44227 Dortmund, Germany
4
Institute of Psychology, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Rudower Chaussee 18, 12489 Berlin, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 12 April 2018 / Revised: 7 June 2018 / Accepted: 27 June 2018 / Published: 3 July 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Ability-Personality Integration)
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Abstract

Personality and intelligence are defined as hierarchical constructs, ranging from broad g-factors to (domain-)specific constructs. The present study investigated whether different combinations of hierarchical levels lead to different personality-intelligence correlations. Based on the integrative data analysis approach, we combined a total of five data sets. The focus of the first study (N = 682) was an elaborated measurement of personality (NEO-PI-R), which was applied with a relatively short intelligence test (Intelligence Structure Test 2000 R). In the second study (N = 413), a comprehensive measurement of intelligence (Berlin Intelligence Structure test) was used with a shorter personality questionnaire (NEO-FFI). In line with the Brunswik symmetry principle, the findings emphasize that personality-intelligence correlations varied greatly across the hierarchical levels of constructs considered in the analysis. On average, Openness showed the largest relation with intelligence. We recommend for future studies to investigate personality-intelligence relations at more fine-grained levels based on elaborated measurements of both personality and intelligence. View Full-Text
Keywords: personality; Big Five; intelligence; Berlin Intelligence Structure model; Brunswik Symmetry; bandwidth fidelity; integrative data analysis personality; Big Five; intelligence; Berlin Intelligence Structure model; Brunswik Symmetry; bandwidth fidelity; integrative data analysis
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Kretzschmar, A.; Spengler, M.; Schubert, A.-L.; Steinmayr, R.; Ziegler, M. The Relation of Personality and Intelligence—What Can the Brunswik Symmetry Principle Tell Us? J. Intell. 2018, 6, 30.

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