Next Article in Journal
Internet Censorship in Arab Countries: Religious and Moral Aspects
Next Article in Special Issue
Towards National Consensus: Spiritual Care in the Australian Healthcare Context
Previous Article in Journal / Special Issue
“Enablement”—Spirituality Engagement in Pre-Registration Nurse Education and Practice: A Grounded Theory Investigation
Article Menu
Issue 11 (November) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Religions 2018, 9(11), 357; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel9110357

The Role of Religious Behavior in Health Self-Management: A Community-Based Participatory Research Study

1
School of Nursing, Azusa Pacific University, 375 Hospitality Lane, San Bernardino, CA 92408, USA
2
School of Nursing, Azusa Pacific University, 901 E. Alosta Ave., Azusa, CA 91702, USA
3
School of Public Health, Loma Linda University, 24951 North Circle Drive, Loma Linda, CA 92350, USA
4
CrossWalk Church, 10421 Corporate Drive, Redlands, CA 92374, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 18 September 2018 / Revised: 29 October 2018 / Accepted: 8 November 2018 / Published: 13 November 2018
Full-Text   |   PDF [774 KB, uploaded 13 November 2018]   |  

Abstract

Prevalence of chronic disease, mental health problems, and risk behaviors in San Bernardino (SB) County reflect some of the worst health outcomes in the State of California and the United States. Using the Integrated Theory of Health Behavior Change (ITHBC) as the theoretical framework, this community-based participatory research (CBPR) study aimed to determine how religious self-regulation skills and ability, and religious behaviors, jointly affect health promotion behaviors among socio-economically challenged residents of southwest SB County, California. A convenience sample of adult residents (N = 261) completed a series of inventories to measure the relationship between modified ITHBC constructs of religious self-regulation skills, religious self-management behaviors, and health outcomes. Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) analysis was conducted to validate the strong positive effect of religious self-regulation skills and ability on how frequently individuals engage in both organized and non-organized religious activities. Results also indicated a significant positive impact of religious behaviors towards healthy eating behaviors. However, without the engagement in religious activities, high religious self-regulation skills and ability inhibited the likelihood of healthy food intake. This faith-related theoretical model provides an avenue for faith-based organizations’ capacity for contributing to community health promotion. View Full-Text
Keywords: religious self-regulation; religious self-management behaviors; healthy eating behaviors; health outcomes; religious support; low socio-economic status; organized and non-organized religious behaviors religious self-regulation; religious self-management behaviors; healthy eating behaviors; health outcomes; religious support; low socio-economic status; organized and non-organized religious behaviors
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Pfeiffer, J.; Li, H.; Martez, M.; Gillespie, T. The Role of Religious Behavior in Health Self-Management: A Community-Based Participatory Research Study. Religions 2018, 9, 357.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Religions EISSN 2077-1444 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert Logo copyright Steve Bridenbaugh/UUA
Back to Top