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Article

Divine Discomfort: A Relational Encounter with Multi-Generational and Multi-Layered Trauma

Practical Theology & Missiology, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch 7602, South Africa
Academic Editor: Gladys Ganiel
Religions 2022, 13(3), 214; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel13030214
Received: 25 December 2021 / Revised: 11 February 2022 / Accepted: 14 February 2022 / Published: 2 March 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Religious Conflict and Peacebuilding: Advances in the Field)
The COVID-19 pandemic has been, and will continue to be, exposed to young democracies who are grappling with deep-seated multi-generational and multi-layered traumas which are embedded in past and present conflicts as well as injustices. In the lead-up to the COVID-19 pandemic, South Africa, being a young democracy, has experienced an increase in anger, violence and vengeance due to on-going poverty, lack of service delivery, housing and land, etc., at all levels of society. The COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated the injustices that are based on the legacy of generational trauma and pain that are caused mainly by an unjust political system, centuries of colonialism, violence, and conflict. These injustices have also exposed the commitment and promises that the religious sector made, during the hearing of the faith communities at the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC), to the reconstruction and development of the country as well as to reconciliation and healing of the nation. Since South Africa became a democracy, the transition process, the first democratic election, the TRC process, political promises, corruption and currently the COVID-19 pandemic have restrained the state of trauma in the country. This restraint has led to a state of frozenness. This contribution argues that the concept of divine discomfort and specifically the notions of accountability and justice can contribute to exploring new ways for religion to deal with the eruption of multi-generational and multi-layered ‘frozen trauma’. View Full-Text
Keywords: divine discomfort; multi-generational and multi-layered traumas; frozen trauma; violence; conflict; dialogical intergenerational pastoral process; responsibility; accountability; justice; COVID-19 pandemic; pastoral care divine discomfort; multi-generational and multi-layered traumas; frozen trauma; violence; conflict; dialogical intergenerational pastoral process; responsibility; accountability; justice; COVID-19 pandemic; pastoral care
MDPI and ACS Style

Thesnaar, C.H. Divine Discomfort: A Relational Encounter with Multi-Generational and Multi-Layered Trauma. Religions 2022, 13, 214. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel13030214

AMA Style

Thesnaar CH. Divine Discomfort: A Relational Encounter with Multi-Generational and Multi-Layered Trauma. Religions. 2022; 13(3):214. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel13030214

Chicago/Turabian Style

Thesnaar, Christoffel H. 2022. "Divine Discomfort: A Relational Encounter with Multi-Generational and Multi-Layered Trauma" Religions 13, no. 3: 214. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel13030214

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