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Article

Religious Environmental Sensemaking in Climate-Induced Conflicts

Department of Comparative Study of Religion, University of Groningen, 9712 GK Groningen, The Netherlands
Academic Editor: Gladys Ganiel
Religions 2022, 13(3), 204; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel13030204
Received: 27 November 2021 / Revised: 18 February 2022 / Accepted: 25 February 2022 / Published: 28 February 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Religious Conflict and Peacebuilding: Advances in the Field)
This article used the case of the Pokot community in northern Kenya to argue that focusing only on technical approaches in dealing with conflicts induced by climate change neglects the deeper religio-spiritual mechanisms that motivate actors in such conflicts and give the latter their texture. For example, the sacred connection with cattle, forests, and land, or the spiritual blessings of cattle raiders in times of competition over dwindling resources raise questions concerning whether and how indigenous religions’ sacred beliefs and practices contribute to finding peaceful solutions to such conflicts and advancing the discourse of religious peacebuilding. This article deployed the concept of religious environmental sense-making to argue that framing climate-induced conflicts in sacred terms influences how actors position themselves within them, as well as their level of intensity and intractability. Answering this question is crucial to advancing the field of peacebuilding, understanding what propels actors in climate-induced conflicts, and comprehending how policy-makers and mediators in conflicts can develop locally grounded strategies to address such climate issues. View Full-Text
Keywords: climate-induced conflict; religious peacebuilding; indigenous religions; traditional knowledge system; religious environmental sensemaking climate-induced conflict; religious peacebuilding; indigenous religions; traditional knowledge system; religious environmental sensemaking
MDPI and ACS Style

Tarusarira, J. Religious Environmental Sensemaking in Climate-Induced Conflicts. Religions 2022, 13, 204. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel13030204

AMA Style

Tarusarira J. Religious Environmental Sensemaking in Climate-Induced Conflicts. Religions. 2022; 13(3):204. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel13030204

Chicago/Turabian Style

Tarusarira, Joram. 2022. "Religious Environmental Sensemaking in Climate-Induced Conflicts" Religions 13, no. 3: 204. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel13030204

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