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Article

Evaluating the Resonance of Official Islam in Oman, Jordan, and Morocco

Middle East Program, The Quincy Institute, Washington, DC 20006, USA
Academic Editor: Jocelyne Cesari
Religions 2021, 12(3), 145; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12030145
Received: 20 December 2020 / Revised: 16 February 2021 / Accepted: 17 February 2021 / Published: 24 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Political Islam in World Politics)
Acts of political violence carried out by Muslim individuals have generated international support for governments that espouse so-called “moderate Islam” as a means of preventing terrorism. Governments also face domestic skepticism about moderate Islam, especially if the alteration of official Islam is seen as resulting from external pressure. By evaluating the views of individuals that disseminate the state’s preferred interpretation of Islam—members of the religious and educational bureaucracy—this research assesses the variation in the resonance of official Islam in three different Arab monarchies: Oman, Jordan, and Morocco. The evidence suggests that if official Islam is consistent with earlier content and directed internally as well as externally, it is likely to resonate. Resonance was highest in Oman, as religious messaging about toleration was both consistent over time and directed internally, and lowest in Jordan, where the content shifted and foreign content differed from domestic. In Morocco, messages about toleration were relatively consistent, although the state’s emphasis on building a reputation for toleration somewhat undermined its domestic credibility. The findings have implications for understanding states’ ability to shift their populations’ views on religion, as well as providing greater nuance for interpreting the capacity of state-sponsored rhetoric to prevent violence. View Full-Text
Keywords: official Islam; resonance; Oman; Jordan; Morocco official Islam; resonance; Oman; Jordan; Morocco
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MDPI and ACS Style

Sheline, A. Evaluating the Resonance of Official Islam in Oman, Jordan, and Morocco. Religions 2021, 12, 145. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12030145

AMA Style

Sheline A. Evaluating the Resonance of Official Islam in Oman, Jordan, and Morocco. Religions. 2021; 12(3):145. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12030145

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sheline, Annelle. 2021. "Evaluating the Resonance of Official Islam in Oman, Jordan, and Morocco" Religions 12, no. 3: 145. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12030145

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