Next Article in Journal
What Else Is New?: Toward a Postcolonial Christian Theology for the Anthropocene
Next Article in Special Issue
When Piety Is Not Enough: Religio-Political Organizations in Pursuit of Peace and Reconciliation in Zimbabwe
Previous Article in Journal
Conversion to Orthodox Christianity in Uganda: A Hundred Years of Spiritual Encounter with Modernity, 1919–2019
Previous Article in Special Issue
Religion and Peace—Anatomy of a Love–Hate Relationship
Open AccessArticle

Reassessing Religion and Politics in the Life of Jagjivan Rām

South and South East Asian Studies Program, School of Culture History and Language, College of Asia and the Pacific, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2600, Australia
Religions 2020, 11(5), 224; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel11050224
Received: 13 March 2020 / Revised: 23 April 2020 / Accepted: 23 April 2020 / Published: 1 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Peace, Politics, and Religion)
Jagjivan Ram (1908–1986) was, for more than four decades, the leading figure from India’s Dalit communities in the Indian National Congress party. In this paper, I argue that the relationship between religion and politics in Jagjivan Ram’s career needs to be reassessed. This is because the common perception of him as a secular politician has overlooked the role that his religious beliefs played in forming his political views. Instead, I argue that his faith in a Dalit Hindu poet-saint called Ravidās was fundamental to his political career. Acknowledging the role that religion played in Jagjivan Ram’s life also allows us to situate discussions of his life in the context of contemporary debates about religion and politics. Jeffrey Haynes has suggested that these often now focus on whether religion is a cause of conflict or a path to the peaceful resolution of conflict. In this paper, I examine Jagjivan Ram’s political life and his belief in the Ravidāsī religious tradition. Through this, I argue that Jagjivan Ram’s career shows how political and religious beliefs led to him favoring a non-confrontational approach to conflict resolution in order to promote Dalit rights. View Full-Text
Keywords: religion; politics; India; Congress Party; Jagjivan Ram; Ravidās; Ambedkar; Dalit studies; untouchable; temple building religion; politics; India; Congress Party; Jagjivan Ram; Ravidās; Ambedkar; Dalit studies; untouchable; temple building
MDPI and ACS Style

Friedlander, P. Reassessing Religion and Politics in the Life of Jagjivan Rām. Religions 2020, 11, 224.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop