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Compass, Continuity and Change. Everyday Religion among Women Living in Asylum Centers in Norway

Centre for Mission and Global Studies, VID Specialized University, Misjonsmarka 12, 4024 Stavanger, Norway
Religions 2020, 11(3), 125; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel11030125
Received: 24 January 2020 / Revised: 2 March 2020 / Accepted: 11 March 2020 / Published: 13 March 2020
When seeking asylum in Norway, asylum seekers are usually placed in asylum centers, where their everyday life is filled with uncertainty and few meaningful activities. Despite the importance of religion for many residents, little attention is paid both by authorities as well as by scholars to the role of religious beliefs and practices in their everyday life within this context. This article is based on ethnographic research with women living in asylum centers over the course of one year. Through the lens of ‘everyday lived religion’, it explores the role and significance of their religious beliefs and practices in their everyday life in the center, as well as the changes that they experience to these. It argues that religion acts as a compass and provides a sense of continuity in the everyday life in the asylum center. The women also experience certain changes to their religious beliefs and practices due to being in a new socio-cultural environment. View Full-Text
Keywords: everyday religion; asylum seekers; Norway; asylum centers; agency everyday religion; asylum seekers; Norway; asylum centers; agency
MDPI and ACS Style

Willmann Robleda, Z. Compass, Continuity and Change. Everyday Religion among Women Living in Asylum Centers in Norway. Religions 2020, 11, 125.

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