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Article

Comparing Nurses’ and Patients’ Comfort Level with Spiritual Assessment

by 1,* and 2
1
Faculty of Health Studies, VID Specialized University, 5009 Bergen, Norway
2
School of Nursing, Azusa Pacific University, Azusa, CA 91702, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Religions 2020, 11(12), 671; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel11120671
Received: 25 September 2020 / Revised: 10 December 2020 / Accepted: 10 December 2020 / Published: 15 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Spirituality in Healthcare—Multidisciplinary Approach)
This paper presents and compares similarities and differences between nurses’ and patients’ reports on comfort levels with spiritual assessment. Spiritual care is a part of nurses’ professional responsibilities; however, nurses continue to report that they are poorly prepared for this. There is limited research on patients’ expectations or perspectives on spiritual care. For the original mixed-method, two-phased study, a 21-item survey with 10 demographic variables, and some open-ended questions related to the comfort level of assessing/being assessed in the spiritual domain were distributed to 172 nurses and 157 hospitalised patients. SPSS was used to analyse and compare the results from nurses and patients; thematic analysis was used to examine the open-ended questions. Nurses reported a higher high degree of comfort with spiritual assessment than patients reported towards being assessed spiritually. Both nurses and patients saw respect and trust as key to building a relationship where open questions related to spirituality can be used as a helpful way to assess patients spiritually. Increased understanding of the best approach toward a patient must be based on the beliefs, values, and practices of that patient so that spiritual care can be individually tailored, and nurses can help patients move along the path to healing. View Full-Text
Keywords: spiritual assessment; comfort level; nurse and patient perspectives; mixed methods; spiritual care spiritual assessment; comfort level; nurse and patient perspectives; mixed methods; spiritual care
MDPI and ACS Style

Giske, T.; Cone, P. Comparing Nurses’ and Patients’ Comfort Level with Spiritual Assessment. Religions 2020, 11, 671. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel11120671

AMA Style

Giske T, Cone P. Comparing Nurses’ and Patients’ Comfort Level with Spiritual Assessment. Religions. 2020; 11(12):671. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel11120671

Chicago/Turabian Style

Giske, Tove, and Pamela Cone. 2020. "Comparing Nurses’ and Patients’ Comfort Level with Spiritual Assessment" Religions 11, no. 12: 671. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel11120671

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