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Article

Spirituality and Healthcare—Common Grounds for the Secular and Religious Worlds and Its Clinical Implications

1
Spiritist-Medical Association of São Paulo, São Paulo, SP 04310-060, Brazil
2
Medicine School, Centro Universitário Lusíada, São Paulo, SP 11050-071, Brazil
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Religions 2021, 12(1), 22; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12010022
Received: 17 November 2020 / Revised: 17 December 2020 / Accepted: 24 December 2020 / Published: 29 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Spirituality in Healthcare—Multidisciplinary Approach)
The spiritual dimension of patients has progressively gained more relevance in healthcare in the last decades. However, the term “spiritual” is an open, fluid concept and, for health purposes, no definition of spirituality is universally accepted. Health professionals and researchers have the challenge to cover the entire spectrum of the spiritual level in their practice. This is particularly difficult because most healthcare courses do not prepare their graduates in this field. They also need to face acts of prejudice by their peers or their managers. Here, the authors aim to clarify some common grounds between secular and religious worlds in the realm of spirituality and healthcare. This is a conceptual manuscript based on the available scientific literature and on the authors’ experience. The text explores the secular and religious intersection involving spirituality and healthcare, together with the common ground shared by the two fields, and consequent clinical implications. Summarisations presented here can be a didactic beginning for practitioners or scholars involved in health or behavioural sciences. The authors think this construct can favour accepting the patient’s spiritual dimension importance by healthcare professionals, treatment institutes, and government policies. View Full-Text
Keywords: religion; spirituality; humanism; healthcare; medicine; secularism; worldviews religion; spirituality; humanism; healthcare; medicine; secularism; worldviews
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MDPI and ACS Style

Saad, M.; de Medeiros, R. Spirituality and Healthcare—Common Grounds for the Secular and Religious Worlds and Its Clinical Implications. Religions 2021, 12, 22. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12010022

AMA Style

Saad M, de Medeiros R. Spirituality and Healthcare—Common Grounds for the Secular and Religious Worlds and Its Clinical Implications. Religions. 2021; 12(1):22. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12010022

Chicago/Turabian Style

Saad, Marcelo, and Roberta de Medeiros. 2021. "Spirituality and Healthcare—Common Grounds for the Secular and Religious Worlds and Its Clinical Implications" Religions 12, no. 1: 22. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12010022

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