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Open AccessArticle

Antisemitism in the Muslim Intellectual Discourse in South Asia

Department of History, Presidency University, Kolkata 700073, India
Religions 2019, 10(7), 442; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel10070442
Received: 31 May 2019 / Revised: 9 July 2019 / Accepted: 15 July 2019 / Published: 19 July 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Return of Religious Antisemitism?)
South Asia (Bangladesh, India, and Pakistan) has produced some of the greatest Islamic thinkers, such as Shah Wali Allah (sometimes also spelled Waliullah; 1702–1763) who is considered one of the originators of pan-Islamism, Rahmatullah Kairanwi (1818–1892), Muhammad Iqbal (1877–1938), Syed Abul A’la Mawdudi (also spelled Maududi; 1903–1979), and Abul Hasan Ali Hasani Nadwi (1914–1999), who have all played a pivotal role in shaping political Islam and have all had global impact. Islamism is intertwined with Muslim antisemitism. Some of the greatest Islamist movements have their bases in South Asia, such as Tablīghi Jamā’at—the largest Sunni Muslim revivalist (daw’a) movement in the world—and Jamā’at-i-Islāmi—a prototype of political Islam in South Asia. The region is home to some of the most important institutions of Islamic theological studies: Darul Ulūm Deoband, the alleged source of ideological inspiration to the Taliban, and Nadwātu’l-’Ulamā and Firangi Mahal, whose curricula are followed by seminaries across the world attended by South Asian Muslims in their diaspora. Some of the most popular Muslim televangelists have come from South Asia, such as Israr Ahmed (1932–2010) and Zakir Naik (b. 1965). This paper gives an introductory overview of antisemitism in the Muslim intellectual discourse in South Asia. View Full-Text
Keywords: antisemitism; Muslim; Islamic; Islamist; Islamism; Jewish; Jews; South Asia; India; Pakistan antisemitism; Muslim; Islamic; Islamist; Islamism; Jewish; Jews; South Asia; India; Pakistan
MDPI and ACS Style

Aafreedi, N.J. Antisemitism in the Muslim Intellectual Discourse in South Asia. Religions 2019, 10, 442. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel10070442

AMA Style

Aafreedi NJ. Antisemitism in the Muslim Intellectual Discourse in South Asia. Religions. 2019; 10(7):442. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel10070442

Chicago/Turabian Style

Aafreedi, Navras J. 2019. "Antisemitism in the Muslim Intellectual Discourse in South Asia" Religions 10, no. 7: 442. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel10070442

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Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

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