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The Ethics of Doing Comparative Hagiology
Open AccessArticle

Dare to Compare: Reflections on Experimenting with Comparative Hagiology

Department of Religious Studies, Gonzaga University, 502 East Boone Avenue, Spokane, WA 99258, USA
Religions 2019, 10(12), 663; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel10120663
Received: 7 November 2019 / Revised: 3 December 2019 / Accepted: 4 December 2019 / Published: 6 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Comparative Hagiology: Issues in Theory and Method)
In this response essay, I consider Jon Keune’s proposal to prioritize the act of comparison over definitional agreement when beginning an exercise in comparative hagiology. Reflecting on my own experience as the respondent for a panel at the 2018 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion (AAR), which saw me comparing two very different “hagiographical texts,” I argue in support of Keune’s approach by stressing its advantage in pushing conceptual creativity and collaborative inclusivity. In the process, I accept Massimo Rondolino’s invitation to consider his working re-definition of “hagiography”, which I take as a starting point for thinking through some of the questions my panel’s unconventional primary texts raise and how they might recommend revisiting our categories. In the end, I advocate for a capacious view of potential comparanda as one of the best ways to foster a process of continuous self-reflection and scholarly development. View Full-Text
Keywords: collaborative scholarship; comparative religions; comparative method; ethics; hagiology; hagiography; religious studies; sainthood; theory and method in religious studies collaborative scholarship; comparative religions; comparative method; ethics; hagiology; hagiography; religious studies; sainthood; theory and method in religious studies
MDPI and ACS Style

Siebeking, R.B. Dare to Compare: Reflections on Experimenting with Comparative Hagiology. Religions 2019, 10, 663.

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