Next Article in Journal
A New Solution for Sea Wave Energy Harvesting, the Proposal of an Ironless Linear Generator
Next Article in Special Issue
Investigation of Growth, Lipid Productivity, and Fatty Acid Profiles in Marine Bloom-Forming Dinoflagellates as Potential Feedstock for Biodiesel
Previous Article in Journal
Determination of Parameters Describing the Risk Areas of Ships Chaotic Rolling on the Example of LNG Carrier and OSV Vessel
Previous Article in Special Issue
Changes in Bacterial Communities in Seawater-Flooded Soil in the Four Years After the 2011 Tohoku Tsunami in Japan
Open AccessReview

The Nagoya Protocol and Its Implications on the EU Atlantic Area Countries

1
Faculty of Sciences, University of Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 4169-007 Porto, Portugal, [email protected] (J.M.)
2
Interdisciplinary Centre of Marine and Environmental Research (CIIMAR/CIMAR), University of Porto, Terminal de Cruzeiros do Porto de Leixões, Avenida General Norton de Matos, S/N, 4450-208 Matosinhos, Portugal
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2020, 8(2), 92; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8020092
Received: 16 January 2020 / Revised: 23 January 2020 / Accepted: 24 January 2020 / Published: 3 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diversity and Biotechnological Potential of Marine Microorganisms)
The Nagoya Protocol on Access to Genetic Resources and Fair and Equitable Sharing of Benefits Arising from their Utilization came into force in October 2014. In the European Union (EU), new legislation had to be developed in order to apply the mandatory elements of the Protocol, namely, the Regulation (EU) Nº 511/2014 (ABS Regulation) and the Implementing Regulation (EU) 2015/1866, laying down detailed rules for the implementation of Regulation ABS with regard to the register of collection, monitor user compliance, and best practices. As a consequence, EU countries had to develop their own legislation in order to implement the Nagoya Protocol (NP), as well as the EU regulations. One important fact that distinguishes the national legislation of the EU countries is that some countries choose to control access to genetic resources (GR), while others do not apply access measures. The Atlantic Area countries in the EU share an attractive coastline with regard to the potential of their GR. In addition, the microalgae industry has been identified as a business sector with high potential. Therefore, it is important for GR users to be informed about the existing regulations and the national differences that may occur within EU countries. In this article, the origins and main content of the Nagoya Protocol are described, together with their implications at the EU level and particularly in the countries of the Atlantic Area region. As a result, a decision framework is proposed in order to support the GR users among this region. View Full-Text
Keywords: biodiversity; genetic resources; regulation (EU) No. 511/2014; access and benefit-sharing; Interreg Atlantic Area biodiversity; genetic resources; regulation (EU) No. 511/2014; access and benefit-sharing; Interreg Atlantic Area
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Martins, J.; Cruz, D.; Vasconcelos, V. The Nagoya Protocol and Its Implications on the EU Atlantic Area Countries. J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2020, 8, 92. https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8020092

AMA Style

Martins J, Cruz D, Vasconcelos V. The Nagoya Protocol and Its Implications on the EU Atlantic Area Countries. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering. 2020; 8(2):92. https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8020092

Chicago/Turabian Style

Martins, Joana; Cruz, Diogo; Vasconcelos, Vitor. 2020. "The Nagoya Protocol and Its Implications on the EU Atlantic Area Countries" J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 8, no. 2: 92. https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8020092

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop