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Article

An Invasive Mussel (Arcuatula senhousia, Benson 1842) Interacts with Resident Biota in Controlling Benthic Ecosystem Functioning

1
University Bordeaux, CNRS, EPOC, EPHE, UMR 5805, 33120 Arcachon, France
2
Tvärminne Zoological Station, University of Helsinki, J.A. Palménin tie 260, FI-10900 Hanko, Finland
3
UMS Patrimoine Naturel (PATRINAT), AFB, MNHN, CNRS, CP41, 36 Rue Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire, 75005 Paris, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2020, 8(12), 963; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8120963
Received: 27 October 2020 / Revised: 23 November 2020 / Accepted: 24 November 2020 / Published: 26 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Benthic Biology and Biogeochemistry)
The invasive mussel Arcuatula senhousia has successfully colonized shallow soft sediments worldwide. This filter feeding mussel modifies sedimentary habitats while forming dense populations and efficiently contributes to nutrient cycling. In the present study, the density of A. senhousia was manipulated in intact sediment cores taken within an intertidal Zostera noltei seagrass meadow in Arcachon Bay (French Atlantic coast), where the species currently occurs at levels corresponding to an early invasion stage. It aimed at testing the effects of a future invasion on (1) bioturbation (bioirrigation and sediment mixing) as well as on (2) total benthic solute fluxes across the sediment–water interface. Results showed that increasing densities of A. senhousia clearly enhanced phosphate and ammonium effluxes, but conversely did not significantly affect community bioturbation rates, highlighting the ability of A. senhousia to control nutrient cycling through strong excretion rates with potential important consequences for nutrient cycling and benthic–pelagic coupling at a broader scale. However, it appears that the variability in the different measured solute fluxes were underpinned by different interactions between the manipulated density of A. senhousia and several faunal and/or environmental drivers, therefore underlining the complexity of anticipating the effects of an invasion process on ecosystem functioning within a realistic context. View Full-Text
Keywords: Arcuatula senhousia; invasive species; ecosystem functioning; benthic fluxes; context dependency; nutrient cycling; seagrass meadow; Arcachon Bay; bioturbation Arcuatula senhousia; invasive species; ecosystem functioning; benthic fluxes; context dependency; nutrient cycling; seagrass meadow; Arcachon Bay; bioturbation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Bernard, G.; Kauppi, L.; Lavesque, N.; Ciutat, A.; Grémare, A.; Massé, C.; Maire, O. An Invasive Mussel (Arcuatula senhousia, Benson 1842) Interacts with Resident Biota in Controlling Benthic Ecosystem Functioning. J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2020, 8, 963. https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8120963

AMA Style

Bernard G, Kauppi L, Lavesque N, Ciutat A, Grémare A, Massé C, Maire O. An Invasive Mussel (Arcuatula senhousia, Benson 1842) Interacts with Resident Biota in Controlling Benthic Ecosystem Functioning. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering. 2020; 8(12):963. https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8120963

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bernard, Guillaume, Laura Kauppi, Nicolas Lavesque, Aurélie Ciutat, Antoine Grémare, Cécile Massé, and Olivier Maire. 2020. "An Invasive Mussel (Arcuatula senhousia, Benson 1842) Interacts with Resident Biota in Controlling Benthic Ecosystem Functioning" Journal of Marine Science and Engineering 8, no. 12: 963. https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8120963

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