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Open AccessArticle

Quality and Nutritional Evaluation of Regina Tomato, a Traditional Long-Storage Landrace of Puglia (Southern Italy)

1
Institute of Sciences of Food Production (ISPA), CNR, via Amendola 122/O, 70126 Bari, Italy
2
Department of Agricultural and Environmental Science, University of Bari Aldo Moro, via Amendola 165/A, 70126 Bari, Italy
3
Institute of Sciences of Food Production (ISPA), CNR, via Lecce-Monteroni, 73100 Lecce, Italy
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Agriculture 2018, 8(6), 83; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture8060083
Received: 10 May 2018 / Revised: 8 June 2018 / Accepted: 11 June 2018 / Published: 13 June 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biodiversity of Vegetable Crops, A Living Heritage)
Regina tomato, a locally cultivated Italian landrace, is listed as an item in the ‘List of Traditional Agri-Food Products’ of the Italian Department for Agriculture and itemised as ‘Slow Food presidium’ by the Slow Food Foundation. It is classified as a long-storage tomato since it can be preserved for several months after harvest thanks to its thick and coriaceous skin. Three ecotypes were investigated for main physical and chemical traits both at harvest and after three months of storage. Experimental results indicate that this tomato landrace has a qualitative profile characterized by high concentrations of tocopherols, lycopene and ascorbic acid (maximum 28.6 and 53.7 mg/kg fresh weight, FW, and 0.28 mg/g FW, respectively) even after a long storage time, together with lower average Total Soluble Solids. The initial and post-storage contents of the bioactive compounds changed at a different rate in each ecotype (i.e., in Monopoli Regina tomato the highest content of α-Tocopherol, thereafter reduced to the same level of the other two ecotypes). These results indicate unique and unmistakable features of this long-storage tomato, closely linked to the geographic origin area that include both natural (available technical inputs) and human (specific cultural practices) factors. View Full-Text
Keywords: ecotypes; geographical origin area; HPLC analyses; long storage time; Solanum lycopersicum L.; heirloom ecotypes; geographical origin area; HPLC analyses; long storage time; Solanum lycopersicum L.; heirloom
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Renna, M.; Durante, M.; Gonnella, M.; Buttaro, D.; D’Imperio, M.; Mita, G.; Serio, F. Quality and Nutritional Evaluation of Regina Tomato, a Traditional Long-Storage Landrace of Puglia (Southern Italy). Agriculture 2018, 8, 83.

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