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Reproductive Effects of Exposure to Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation: A Long-Term Follow-Up of Immigrant Women Exposed to the Chernobyl Accident

1
The Center for Women’s Health Studies and Promotion, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, POB 653, Beer Sheva 84105, Israel
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Department of Epidemiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, POB 653, Beer Sheva 84105, Israel
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OB-GYN (Women’s B ward), Soroka University Medical Center, Beer Sheva 84105, Israel
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Independent Researcher, San Francisco, CA, USA
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Nuclear Medicine, Soroka University Medical Center (retired), Beer Sheva 84105, Israel
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(6), 1786; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9061786
Received: 10 May 2020 / Revised: 29 May 2020 / Accepted: 3 June 2020 / Published: 8 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Obstetrics & Gynecology)
The Chernobyl accident in 1986 spread ionizing radiation over extensive areas of Belarus and Ukraine, leading to adverse health effects in exposed children. More than 30 years later, exposed children have grown and became parents themselves. This retrospective study from Israel was aimed to evaluate whether Chernobyl-exposed women are at higher risk for adverse reproductive outcomes. Exposed immigrants were identified as high or low exposure based on Caesium-137 soil contamination levels registered in the town they lived in. The exposed group was age matched with three comparison groups: non-exposed immigrant women from the Former Soviet Union (FSU) excluding Belarus and the Ukraine, immigrants from other countries (Non FSU) and Israeli-born women at a ratio of 1:10. Chernobyl-exposed women were more likely to be nulliparous and have fewer children (2.1 + 0.8 vs. 3.1 + 1.8, p < 0.001), were more likely to undergo fertility treatments (8.8% vs. 5.8%, adjusted OR = 1.8, 95%CI 1.04–3.2, p = 0.036), and were also more likely to have anemia after delivery (49.4% vs. 36.6%, OR = 1.7, 95%CI 1.2–2.3, p = 0.001), compared to women in the combined comparison groups. The overall fertility of Chernobyl-exposed women seems to be reduced as reflected by the lower number of children and their greater need for fertility treatments. View Full-Text
Keywords: Chernobyl; radiation; exposure; fertility; pregnancy; follow up; long term Chernobyl; radiation; exposure; fertility; pregnancy; follow up; long term
MDPI and ACS Style

Cwikel, J.; Sergienko, R.; Gutvirtz, G.; Abramovitz, R.; Slusky, D.; Quastel, M.; Sheiner, E. Reproductive Effects of Exposure to Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation: A Long-Term Follow-Up of Immigrant Women Exposed to the Chernobyl Accident. J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 1786. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9061786

AMA Style

Cwikel J, Sergienko R, Gutvirtz G, Abramovitz R, Slusky D, Quastel M, Sheiner E. Reproductive Effects of Exposure to Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation: A Long-Term Follow-Up of Immigrant Women Exposed to the Chernobyl Accident. Journal of Clinical Medicine. 2020; 9(6):1786. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9061786

Chicago/Turabian Style

Cwikel, Julie, Ruslan Sergienko, Gil Gutvirtz, Rachel Abramovitz, Danna Slusky, Michael Quastel, and Eyal Sheiner. 2020. "Reproductive Effects of Exposure to Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation: A Long-Term Follow-Up of Immigrant Women Exposed to the Chernobyl Accident" Journal of Clinical Medicine 9, no. 6: 1786. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9061786

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