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Open AccessArticle

Do Centenarians Die Healthier than Younger Elders? A Comparative Epidemiological Study in Spain

1
Aragon Health Service (SALUD), EpiChron Research Group, 50009 Zaragoza, Spain
2
Red de Investigación en Servicios de Salud en Enfermedades Crónicas (REDISSEC), 28222 Madrid, Spain
3
EpiChron Research Group, IIS Aragón, 50009 Zaragoza, Spain
4
EpiChron Research Group, Aragon Health Sciences Institute (IACS), IIS Aragón, Miguel Servet University Hospital, 50009 Zaragoza, Spain
5
Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Biodonostia, Grupo de Atención Primaria, 20014 San Sebastián, Spain
6
Instituto de Investigación en Servicios de Salud Kronikgune, 48902 Barakaldo, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work and served as first co-authors.
These authors contributed equally to this work and served as senior co-authors.
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(5), 1563; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9051563
Received: 16 April 2020 / Revised: 11 May 2020 / Accepted: 19 May 2020 / Published: 21 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Epidemiology & Public Health)
This study aims to describe the clinical course, drug use, and health services use characteristics during the last year of life of elders who die being centenarians and to identify key aspects differentiating them from elders who die at an earlier age, with a particular focus on sex differences. We conducted an observational, population-based study in the EpiChron Cohort (Aragón, Spain). The population was stratified by sex and into three age sub-populations (80–89, 90–99, and ≥100 years), and their characteristics were described and compared. Multimorbidity was the rule in our elders, affecting up to 3 in 4 centenarians and 9 in 10 octogenarians and nonagenarians. Polypharmacy was also observed in half of the centenarian population and in most of the younger elders. Risk factors for cardiovascular disease (i.e., hypertension, dyslipidaemia, diabetes), cerebrovascular disease and dementia were amongst the most common chronic conditions in all age groups, whereas the gastroprotective drugs and antithrombotic agents were the most dispensed drugs. Centenarians presented in general lower morbidity and treatment burden and lower use of both primary and hospital healthcare services than octogenarians and nonagenarians, suggesting a better health status. Sex-differences in their clinical characteristics were more striking in octogenarians and tended to decrease with age. View Full-Text
Keywords: aged 80 and over; delivery of healthcare; electronic health records; multimorbidity; multiple chronic conditions; polypharmacy; real-world data aged 80 and over; delivery of healthcare; electronic health records; multimorbidity; multiple chronic conditions; polypharmacy; real-world data
MDPI and ACS Style

Clerencia-Sierra, M.; Ioakeim-Skoufa, I.; Poblador-Plou, B.; González-Rubio, F.; Aza-Pascual-Salcedo, M.; Machón, M.; Gimeno-Miguel, A.; Prados-Torres, A. Do Centenarians Die Healthier than Younger Elders? A Comparative Epidemiological Study in Spain. J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 1563.

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