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Article

Effectiveness of Hypopressive Exercises in Women with Pelvic Floor Dysfunction: A Randomised Controlled Trial

1
Physiotherapy in Women’s Health (FPSM) Research Group. Physiotherapy Department, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Alcalá, Alcalá de Henares, 28805 Madrid, Spain
2
Applied statistical methods in Medical Research Group, Catholic University of Murcia (UCAM), 30107 Murcia, Spain
3
School of Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON K1H 8M5, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(4), 1149; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9041149
Received: 11 March 2020 / Revised: 3 April 2020 / Accepted: 15 April 2020 / Published: 17 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Obstetrics & Gynecology)
Hypopressive exercises have emerged as a conservative treatment option for pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD). The aim of this study was to compare the effects of an eight-week hypopressive exercise program to those of an individualized pelvic floor muscle (PFM) training (PFMT) program, and to a combination of both immediately after treatment and at follow-up assessments at 3, 6 and 12 months later. The study was a prospective, single-centre, assessor-blinded, randomised controlled trial. Ninety-four women with PFD were assigned to PFMT (n = 32), hypopressive exercises (n = 31) or both (n = 31). All programs included the same educational component, and instruction about lifestyle interventions and the knack manoeuvre. Primary outcomes were the Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory Short Form (PFDI-20); the Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire Short Form (PFIQ-7); PFM strength (manometry and dynamometry) and pelvic floor basal tone (dynamometry). There were no statistically significant differences between groups at baseline, nor after the intervention. Overall, women reduced their symptoms (24.41–30.5 on the PFDI-20); improved their quality of life (14.78–21.49 on the PFIQ-7), improved their PFM strength (8.61–9.32 cmH2O on manometry; 106.2–247.7 g on dynamometry), and increased their pelvic floor basal tone (1.8–22.9 g on dynamometry). These data suggest that individual PFMT, hypopressive exercises and a combination of both interventions significantly reduce PFD symptoms, enhance quality of life, and improve PFM strength and basal tone in women with PFD, both in the short and longer term. View Full-Text
Keywords: hypopressive exercises; adherence; pelvic floor dysfunction; pelvic floor exercise; physiotherapy; quality of life hypopressive exercises; adherence; pelvic floor dysfunction; pelvic floor exercise; physiotherapy; quality of life
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MDPI and ACS Style

Navarro-Brazález, B.; Prieto-Gómez, V.; Prieto-Merino, D.; Sánchez-Sánchez, B.; McLean, L.; Torres-Lacomba, M. Effectiveness of Hypopressive Exercises in Women with Pelvic Floor Dysfunction: A Randomised Controlled Trial. J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 1149. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9041149

AMA Style

Navarro-Brazález B, Prieto-Gómez V, Prieto-Merino D, Sánchez-Sánchez B, McLean L, Torres-Lacomba M. Effectiveness of Hypopressive Exercises in Women with Pelvic Floor Dysfunction: A Randomised Controlled Trial. Journal of Clinical Medicine. 2020; 9(4):1149. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9041149

Chicago/Turabian Style

Navarro-Brazález, Beatriz, Virginia Prieto-Gómez, David Prieto-Merino, Beatriz Sánchez-Sánchez, Linda McLean, and María Torres-Lacomba. 2020. "Effectiveness of Hypopressive Exercises in Women with Pelvic Floor Dysfunction: A Randomised Controlled Trial" Journal of Clinical Medicine 9, no. 4: 1149. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9041149

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