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Open AccessArticle

Real-Life Patterns of Exacerbations While on Inhaled Corticosteroids and Long-Acting Beta Agonists for Asthma over 15 Years

1
Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA
2
PRecisiOn Medicine Translational Research (PROMoTeR) Center, Department of Population Medicine, Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
3
Kaiser Permanente Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente, Oakland, CA 94612, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(3), 819; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9030819
Received: 7 February 2020 / Revised: 10 March 2020 / Accepted: 16 March 2020 / Published: 18 March 2020
Asthma affects more than 300 million people in the world, costs over $80 billion annually in the United States, and is efficaciously treated with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS). To our knowledge, no studies have examined the real-world effectiveness of ICS, including the combination therapy consisting of ICS and long-acting beta agonists (LABAs), and patterns of use over a 15-year time period. We used data from the Kaiser Permanente Northern California multi-ethnic Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging (GERA) Cohort which comprises longitudinal electronic health record data of over 100,000 people. Data included longitudinal asthma-related events, such as ambulatory office visits, hospitalizations, emergency department (ED) visits, and fills of ICS and ICS–LABA combination. Asthma exacerbations were defined as an asthma-related ED visit, hospitalization, or oral corticosteroid (OCS) burst. We used an expected-value approach to determine ICS and ICS–LABA coverage over exacerbation events. We compared rates of exacerbation of subjects on ICS or ICS–LABAs to their own rates of exacerbation when off controller medications. We found ICS–LABA therapy had significant effects, reducing all types of exacerbations per day by a factor of 1.76 (95% CI (1.06, 2.93), p = 0.03) and, specifically, bursts per day by a factor of 1.91 (95% CI (1.04, 3.53), p = 0.037). In conclusion, ICS–LABA therapy was significantly associated with fewer asthma-related exacerbations in a large population of individuals with asthma who were followed for 15 years. View Full-Text
Keywords: asthma; inhaled corticosteroids; long-acting beta agonist; clinical data; exacerbations; efficacy asthma; inhaled corticosteroids; long-acting beta agonist; clinical data; exacerbations; efficacy
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McGeachie, M.J.; Wang, A.L.; Lutz, S.M.; Sordillo, J.E.; Weiss, S.T.; Tantisira, K.G.; Iribarren, C.; Lu, M.X.; Wu, A.C. Real-Life Patterns of Exacerbations While on Inhaled Corticosteroids and Long-Acting Beta Agonists for Asthma over 15 Years. J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 819.

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