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Special Issue: Sleep Bruxism—The Controversial Sleep Movement Activity
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Pain Predictors in a Population of Temporomandibular Disorders Patients
Open AccessArticle

Correlations between Sleep Bruxism and Temporomandibular Disorders

1
Department of Prosthodontics, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 400, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany
2
Institute of Medical Biometry and Informatics (IMBI), University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 130.3, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany
3
Department of Prosthodontics, University of Würzburg, Pleicherwall 2, 97070 Würzburg, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(2), 611; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9020611
Received: 10 February 2020 / Revised: 21 February 2020 / Accepted: 22 February 2020 / Published: 24 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sleep Bruxism—The Controversial Sleep Movement Activity)
The aim of this study was to identify correlations between sleep bruxism (SB) and temporomandibular disorders (TMD) as diagnosed by means of the research diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders (RDC/TMD). Sleep bruxism was diagnosed on the basis of I) validated questionnaires, II) clinical symptoms, and III) electromyographic/electrocardiographic data. A total of 110 subjects were included in the study. Fifty-eight patients were identified as bruxers and 52 as nonbruxers. A psychosocial assessment was also performed. An RDC/TMD group-I diagnosis (myofascial pain) was made for 10 out of 58 bruxers, whereas none of the nonbruxers received a diagnosis of this type. No significant differences were found between bruxers and nonbruxers with regard to RDC/TMD group-II (disc displacement) and group-III (arthralgia, arthritis, arthrosis) diagnoses. Somatization was significantly more common among bruxers than nonbruxers. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that somatization was the only factor significantly correlated with the diagnosis of myofascial pain. The results of this study indicate a correlation between myofascial pain, as diagnosed using the RDC/TMD, and somatization. It seems that somatization is a stronger predictor of an RDC/TMD diagnosis of myofascial pain than sleep bruxism is. View Full-Text
Keywords: sleep bruxism; TMD; electromyographic/electrocardiographic data sleep bruxism; TMD; electromyographic/electrocardiographic data
MDPI and ACS Style

Ohlmann, B.; Waldecker, M.; Leckel, M.; Bömicke, W.; Behnisch, R.; Rammelsberg, P.; Schmitter, M. Correlations between Sleep Bruxism and Temporomandibular Disorders. J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 611.

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