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Preparation of PCI Balloons: What Is the Best Method to Avoid Air in the Balloon? A Comparison of Different Methods of Connecting PCI Balloons and the Inflation Syringe while Removing Air from the Balloon

1
Internistisches Klinikum München Süd, Peter Osypka Herzzentrum, 81379 München, Germany
2
Klinik und Poliklinik Innere Medizin I (Kardiologie, Angiologie, Pneumologie), Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, 81379 München, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(1), 172; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9010172
Received: 8 December 2019 / Revised: 3 January 2020 / Accepted: 6 January 2020 / Published: 8 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Research of Percutaneous Coronary Intervention)
As the techniques to connect percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) balloons and the inflation syringe vary in the instructions for use and in practice, we measured the amount of air in PCI balloons after testing three connection methods to an inflation syringe. Following the preparation using one of the three methods, 114 balloons and stent balloons were tested four times. Method 1 connected the syringe and the balloon catheter directly after purging and filling the lumen, while method 3 omitted the purging and filling process. With method 2, the catheter lumen was purged, filled and fully vented via a three-way valve. The primary endpoint answered whether air remained in the balloon, and if so, the secondary endpoint indicated the total volume of remaining air. The connection with a three-way valve achieved significantly less air in the inflated balloon as compared with either direct connection approach (27% vs. 44% and 51%; p = 0.015). For the direct connection, no significant difference between purging and filling the lumen prior to making the connection or not existed. According to these findings, the best method to connect a PCI balloon to the inflation syringe while removing air involves using a three-way valve. View Full-Text
Keywords: percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI); balloon inflation; balloon preparation; air remocal; acute coronary syndrome (ACS) percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI); balloon inflation; balloon preparation; air remocal; acute coronary syndrome (ACS)
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Kreuser, L.; Laugwitz, K.-L.; Tiemann, K.; Lewalter, T.; Jilek, C. Preparation of PCI Balloons: What Is the Best Method to Avoid Air in the Balloon? A Comparison of Different Methods of Connecting PCI Balloons and the Inflation Syringe while Removing Air from the Balloon. J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 172.

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