Next Article in Journal
Heart Rate Variability and Perceived Stress as Measurements of Relaxation Response
Next Article in Special Issue
NK Cell Reconstitution in Paediatric Leukemic Patients after T-Cell-Depleted HLA-Haploidentical Haematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Followed by the Reinfusion of iCasp9-Modified Donor T Cells
Previous Article in Journal
Outcomes of Total Hip Arthroplasty in Patients with Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head Following Surgical Treatment of Brain Tumors
Previous Article in Special Issue
NK Cell-Fc Receptors Advance Tumor Immunotherapy
Open AccessReview

NK Cell-Based Immunotherapy for Hematological Malignancies

1
Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Genoa, 16132 Genoa, Italy
2
Centre of Excellence for Biomedical Research, University of Genoa, 16132 Genoa, Italy
3
Department of Integrated Oncological Therapies, IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico San Martino, 16132 Genoa, Italy
4
Department of Hematology/Oncology, IRCCS Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesù, 00165 Rome, Italy
5
Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, University of Naples Federico II, 80131 Naples, Italy
6
Integrated Department of Services and Laboratories, IRCCS Istituto Giannina Gaslini, 16147 Genoa, Italy
7
Department of Immunology, IRCCS Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesù, 00146 Rome, Italy
8
Department of Gynecology/Obstetrics and Pediatrics, Sapienza University, 00185 Rome, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(10), 1702; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8101702
Received: 20 September 2019 / Revised: 10 October 2019 / Accepted: 11 October 2019 / Published: 16 October 2019
Natural killer (NK) lymphocytes are an integral component of the innate immune system and represent important effector cells in cancer immunotherapy, particularly in the control of hematological malignancies. Refined knowledge of NK cellular and molecular biology has fueled the interest in NK cell-based antitumor therapies, and recent efforts have been made to exploit the high potential of these cells in clinical practice. Infusion of high numbers of mature NK cells through the novel graft manipulation based on the selective depletion of T cells and CD19+ B cells has resulted into an improved outcome in children with acute leukemia given human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-haploidentical hematopoietic transplantation. Likewise, adoptive transfer of purified third-party NK cells showed promising results in patients with myeloid malignancies. Strategies based on the use of cytokines or monoclonal antibodies able to induce and optimize NK cell activation, persistence, and expansion also represent a novel field of investigation with remarkable perspectives of favorably impacting on outcome of patients with hematological neoplasia. In addition, preliminary results suggest that engineering of mature NK cells through chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) constructs deserve further investigation, with the goal of obtaining an “off-the-shelf” NK cell bank that may serve many different recipients for granting an efficient antileukemia activity. View Full-Text
Keywords: NK cells; receptors; acute leukemia; hematopoietic stem cell transplantation; HLA class I; killer immunoglobulin-like receptors; NK cell alloreactivity; cytokines; CAR-NK cells; immunotherapy NK cells; receptors; acute leukemia; hematopoietic stem cell transplantation; HLA class I; killer immunoglobulin-like receptors; NK cell alloreactivity; cytokines; CAR-NK cells; immunotherapy
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Sivori, S.; Meazza, R.; Quintarelli, C.; Carlomagno, S.; Della Chiesa, M.; Falco, M.; Moretta, L.; Locatelli, F.; Pende, D. NK Cell-Based Immunotherapy for Hematological Malignancies. J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8, 1702.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop