Next Article in Journal
Use of Linagliptin for the Management of Medicine Department Inpatients with Type 2 Diabetes in Real-World Clinical Practice (Lina-Real-World Study)
Next Article in Special Issue
FABP4 in Gestational Diabetes—Association between Mothers and Offspring
Previous Article in Journal
Risk and Predisposing Factors for Suicide Attempts in Patients with Migraine and Status Migrainosus: A Nationwide Population-Based Study
Previous Article in Special Issue
A Comprehensive Feature Analysis of the Fetal Heart Rate Signal for the Intelligent Assessment of Fetal State
Open AccessArticle

Body Fatness and Cardiovascular Health in Newborn Infants

1
Boden Institute of Obesity, Charles Perkins Centre, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
2
Faculty of Medicine and Health, Charles Perkins Centre, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
3
Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Missenden Road, Camperdown, NSW 2050, Australia
4
Sydney School of Public Health, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
5
School of Medical Sciences & Bosch Institute, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
J. Clin. Med. 2018, 7(9), 270; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm7090270
Received: 16 August 2018 / Revised: 4 September 2018 / Accepted: 8 September 2018 / Published: 11 September 2018
Birth weight is associated with cardiovascular disease, with those at both ends of the spectrum at increased risk. However, birth weight is a crude surrogate of fetal growth. Measures of body composition may more accurately identify high risk infants. We aimed to determine whether aortic wall thickening, cardiac autonomic control, and cardiac structure/function differ in newborns with high or low body fatness compared to those with average body fatness. 189 healthy singleton term born neonates were recruited and stratified by body fat percentiles (sex and gestation-specific). Infants with low body fat had higher aortic intima-media thickness (43 µm (95% confidence interval (CI) 7, 78), p = 0.02), lower heart rate variability (log total power, −0.5 (95% CI −0.8, −0.1), p = 0.008), and thicker ventricular walls (posterior wall thickness, 3.1 mm (95% CI 1.6, 4.6), p < 0.001) compared to infants with average body fatness. Infants with high body fat showed no differences in aortic intima-media thickness (−2 µm (95% CI −37, 33), p = 0.91) or cardiac structure compared to average body fatness, although stroke volume (−0.3 mL/kg (95% CI −0.6, −0.0), p = 0.003) and heart rate variability were lower (log total power, −0.8 (95% CI −1.1, −0.5), p < 0.001). The non-linear association of body fatness with heart rate variability was independent of birth weight. Infants born with low or high body fat have altered markers of cardiovascular health. Assessment of body fatness alongside birth weight may assist in identifying high risk individuals. View Full-Text
Keywords: newborn body fatness; cardiovascular disease; aortic intima-media thickness; autonomic function; cardiac structure; cardiac function newborn body fatness; cardiovascular disease; aortic intima-media thickness; autonomic function; cardiac structure; cardiac function
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Dissanayake, H.U.; McMullan, R.L.; Kong, Y.; Caterson, I.D.; Celermajer, D.S.; Phang, M.; Raynes-Greenow, C.; Polson, J.W.; Gordon, A.; Skilton, M.R. Body Fatness and Cardiovascular Health in Newborn Infants. J. Clin. Med. 2018, 7, 270.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop