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Article

Long-Term Outcomes of Targeted Therapy after First-Line Immunotherapy in BRAF-Mutated Advanced Cutaneous Melanoma Patients—Real-World Evidence

1
Department of Soft Tissue/Bone Sarcoma and Melansoma, Maria Sklodowska-Curie National Research Institute of Oncology, 02-781 Warsaw, Poland
2
Department of Experimental Pharmacology, Mossakowski Medical Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, 02-106 Warsaw, Poland
3
Department of Clinical Oncology, Maria Sklodowska-Curie National Research Institute of Oncology, Cracow Branch, 31-115 Kraków, Poland
4
Department of Surgical Oncology, Wroclaw Comprehensive Cancer Center, 53-413 Wroclaw, Poland
5
Department of Oncology, Wroclaw Medical University, 50-376 Wroclaw, Poland
6
Department of Clinical Oncology, Holy Cross Cancer Center, 25-734 Kielce, Poland
7
Department of Medical and Experimental Oncology, University of Medical Sciences, 61-701 Poznan, Poland
8
Department of Clinical Oncology, Wroclaw Comprehensive Cancer Center, 53-413 Wroclaw, Poland
9
Department of Chemotherapy, Maria Sklodowska-Curie National Research Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch, 44-102 Gliwice, Poland
10
Subcarpathian Oncology Center, 35-061 Rzeszów, Poland
11
The Skin Cancer and Melanoma Team, Department of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Hematology-Oncology, Maria Sklodowska-Curie National Research Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch, 44-102 Gliwice, Poland
12
II Clinic of Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy, Maria Sklodowska-Curie National Research Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch, 44-102 Gliwice, Poland
13
Department of Diagnostics and Cancer Immunology, Greater Poland Cancer Centre, 61-866 Poznan, Poland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Aram Boada
J. Clin. Med. 2022, 11(8), 2239; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm11082239
Received: 23 March 2022 / Revised: 12 April 2022 / Accepted: 13 April 2022 / Published: 17 April 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cutaneous Melanoma: Current Diagnosis and Treatment Strategies)
Background: Currently, limited data on targeted therapy and immunotherapy sequencing in patients with BRAF-mutant melanoma is available. Targeted therapy and immunotherapy are expected to be comparable in terms of overall survival (OS) when used as second-line therapies; therefore, understanding the characteristics of patients who completed sequential treatment is needed. Methods: The primary objective of this study was to analyze the efficacy of BRAFi/MEKi activity as second-line therapy in patients with advanced melanoma. We also aimed to describe the clinical characteristics of patients with advanced melanoma who were treated sequentially with immunotherapy and targeted therapy. We enrolled 97 patients treated between 1st December 2015 and 31st December 2020 with first-line immunotherapy with programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) checkpoint inhibitors; and for the second-line treatment with at least one cycle of BRAFi/MEKi therapy with follow-up through 31 January 2022. Results: Median OS since first-line treatment initiation was 19.9 months and 12.8 months since initiation of BRAFi/MEKi treatment. All BRAFi/MRKi combinations were similarly effective. Median progression free survival (PFS) was 7.5 months since initiation of any BRAFi/MEKi treatment. Conclusions: BRAFi/MEKi therapy is effective in the second-line in advanced and metastatic melanoma patients. For the first time, the efficacy of all BRAFi/MEKi combinations as second-line therapy is shown. View Full-Text
Keywords: melanoma; BRAF; dabrafenib; vemurafenib; encorafenib melanoma; BRAF; dabrafenib; vemurafenib; encorafenib
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MDPI and ACS Style

Rogala, P.; Czarnecka, A.M.; Cybulska-Stopa, B.; Ostaszewski, K.; Piejko, K.; Ziętek, M.; Dziura, R.; Rutkowska, E.; Galus, Ł.; Kempa-Kamińska, N.; Calik, J.; Sałek-Zań, A.; Zemełka, T.; Bal, W.; Kamycka, A.; Świtaj, T.; Kamińska-Winciorek, G.; Suwiński, R.; Mackiewicz, J.; Rutkowski, P. Long-Term Outcomes of Targeted Therapy after First-Line Immunotherapy in BRAF-Mutated Advanced Cutaneous Melanoma Patients—Real-World Evidence. J. Clin. Med. 2022, 11, 2239. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm11082239

AMA Style

Rogala P, Czarnecka AM, Cybulska-Stopa B, Ostaszewski K, Piejko K, Ziętek M, Dziura R, Rutkowska E, Galus Ł, Kempa-Kamińska N, Calik J, Sałek-Zań A, Zemełka T, Bal W, Kamycka A, Świtaj T, Kamińska-Winciorek G, Suwiński R, Mackiewicz J, Rutkowski P. Long-Term Outcomes of Targeted Therapy after First-Line Immunotherapy in BRAF-Mutated Advanced Cutaneous Melanoma Patients—Real-World Evidence. Journal of Clinical Medicine. 2022; 11(8):2239. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm11082239

Chicago/Turabian Style

Rogala, Paweł, Anna M. Czarnecka, Bożena Cybulska-Stopa, Krzysztof Ostaszewski, Karolina Piejko, Marcin Ziętek, Robert Dziura, Ewa Rutkowska, Łukasz Galus, Natasza Kempa-Kamińska, Jacek Calik, Agata Sałek-Zań, Tomasz Zemełka, Wiesław Bal, Agnieszka Kamycka, Tomasz Świtaj, Grażyna Kamińska-Winciorek, Rafał Suwiński, Jacek Mackiewicz, and Piotr Rutkowski. 2022. "Long-Term Outcomes of Targeted Therapy after First-Line Immunotherapy in BRAF-Mutated Advanced Cutaneous Melanoma Patients—Real-World Evidence" Journal of Clinical Medicine 11, no. 8: 2239. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm11082239

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