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Child Anthropometrics and Neurodevelopment at 2 and 3 Years of Age Following an Antenatal Lifestyle Intervention in Routine Care—A Secondary Analysis from the Cluster-Randomised GeliS Trial

1
Institute of Nutritional Medicine, Else Kröner-Fresenius-Centre for Nutritional Medicine, School of Medicine, Technical University of Munich, Georg-Brauchle-Ring 62, 80992 Munich, Germany
2
Centre for Hormonal Disorders in Children and Adolescents, Division of Paediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes, Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Ulm University Medical Centre, Eythstraße 24, 89075 Ulm, Germany
3
European Foundation for the Care of Newborn Infants (EFCNI), Hofmannstraße 7a, 81379 Munich, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Karen Benzies
J. Clin. Med. 2022, 11(6), 1688; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm11061688
Received: 16 February 2022 / Revised: 2 March 2022 / Accepted: 15 March 2022 / Published: 18 March 2022
(This article belongs to the Section Obstetrics & Gynecology)
Maternal characteristics around pregnancy may influence obesity risk and neurodevelopment in children. To date, the effect of antenatal lifestyle interventions on long-term child development is unclear. The objective was to investigate the potential long-term effects of an antenatal lifestyle intervention programme conducted alongside routine care on child anthropometrics and neurodevelopment up to 3 years of age. Mother-child pairs from the cluster-randomised GeliS trial were followed up to 3 years of age. Data on child anthropometrics in both groups were collected from routine health examinations. Neurodevelopment was assessed via questionnaire. Of the 2286 study participants, 1644 mother-child pairs were included in the analysis. Children from the intervention group were less likely to score below the cut-off in Fine motor (p = 0.002), and more likely to have a score below the cut-off in Problem-solving (p < 0.001) compared to the control group at 3 years of age. Mean weight, height, head circumference, body mass index, and the respective z-scores and percentiles were comparable between the groups at 2 and 3 years of age. We found no evidence that the lifestyle intervention affected offspring development up to 3 years of age. Further innovative intervention approaches are required to improve child health in the long-term. View Full-Text
Keywords: child development; anthropometrics; neurodevelopment; antenatal lifestyle intervention; routine care; obesity prevention child development; anthropometrics; neurodevelopment; antenatal lifestyle intervention; routine care; obesity prevention
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MDPI and ACS Style

Spies, M.; Geyer, K.; Raab, R.; Brandt, S.; Meyer, D.; Günther, J.; Hoffmann, J.; Hauner, H. Child Anthropometrics and Neurodevelopment at 2 and 3 Years of Age Following an Antenatal Lifestyle Intervention in Routine Care—A Secondary Analysis from the Cluster-Randomised GeliS Trial. J. Clin. Med. 2022, 11, 1688. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm11061688

AMA Style

Spies M, Geyer K, Raab R, Brandt S, Meyer D, Günther J, Hoffmann J, Hauner H. Child Anthropometrics and Neurodevelopment at 2 and 3 Years of Age Following an Antenatal Lifestyle Intervention in Routine Care—A Secondary Analysis from the Cluster-Randomised GeliS Trial. Journal of Clinical Medicine. 2022; 11(6):1688. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm11061688

Chicago/Turabian Style

Spies, Monika, Kristina Geyer, Roxana Raab, Stephanie Brandt, Dorothy Meyer, Julia Günther, Julia Hoffmann, and Hans Hauner. 2022. "Child Anthropometrics and Neurodevelopment at 2 and 3 Years of Age Following an Antenatal Lifestyle Intervention in Routine Care—A Secondary Analysis from the Cluster-Randomised GeliS Trial" Journal of Clinical Medicine 11, no. 6: 1688. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm11061688

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