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Article

Biliary Atresia in 2021: Epidemiology, Screening and Public Policy

1
Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3, Canada
2
Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston, TX 77030, USA
3
Department of Surgery, Division of Pediatric Surgery, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, 9713 GZ Groningen, The Netherlands
4
Swiss Pediatric Liver Center, Division of Pediatric Surgery, Department of Pediatrics, Gynecology, and Obstetrics, University of Geneva, 1205 Geneva, Switzerland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Partners of the European reference network RARE-LIVER.
Academic Editor: Claus Petersen
J. Clin. Med. 2022, 11(4), 999; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm11040999
Received: 24 December 2021 / Revised: 5 February 2022 / Accepted: 9 February 2022 / Published: 14 February 2022
(This article belongs to the Collection Biliary Atresia: Aetiology, Diagnosis and Treatment)
Biliary atresia (BA) is a rare newborn liver disease with significant morbidity and mortality, especially if not recognized and treated early in life. It is the most common cause of liver-related death in children and the leading indication for liver transplantation in the pediatric population. Timely intervention with a Kasai portoenterostomy (KPE) can significantly improve prognosis. Delayed disease recognition, late patient referral, and untimely surgery remains a worldwide problem. This article will focus on biliary atresia from a global public health perspective, including disease epidemiology, current national screening programs, and their impact on outcome, as well as new and novel BA screening initiatives. Policy challenges for the implementation of BA screening programs will also be discussed, highlighting examples from the North American, European, and Asian experience. View Full-Text
Keywords: biliary atresia; pediatric liver disease; newborn screening; public health; epidemiology biliary atresia; pediatric liver disease; newborn screening; public health; epidemiology
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MDPI and ACS Style

Schreiber, R.A.; Harpavat, S.; Hulscher, J.B.F.; Wildhaber, B.E. Biliary Atresia in 2021: Epidemiology, Screening and Public Policy. J. Clin. Med. 2022, 11, 999. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm11040999

AMA Style

Schreiber RA, Harpavat S, Hulscher JBF, Wildhaber BE. Biliary Atresia in 2021: Epidemiology, Screening and Public Policy. Journal of Clinical Medicine. 2022; 11(4):999. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm11040999

Chicago/Turabian Style

Schreiber, Richard A., Sanjiv Harpavat, Jan B. F. Hulscher, and Barbara E. Wildhaber. 2022. "Biliary Atresia in 2021: Epidemiology, Screening and Public Policy" Journal of Clinical Medicine 11, no. 4: 999. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm11040999

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