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Article

Daytime Neuromuscular Electrical Therapy of Tongue Muscles in Improving Snoring in Individuals with Primary Snoring and Mild Obstructive Sleep Apnea

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Departmento de ORL, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, 31008 Pamplona, Spain
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Servicio de ORL, Hospital Doctor Peset, 46017 Valencia, Spain
3
Queen’s Hospital, Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust, Rom Valley Way, Romford Essex RM7 0AG, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Michael Setzen
J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10(9), 1883; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10091883
Received: 25 March 2021 / Revised: 18 April 2021 / Accepted: 20 April 2021 / Published: 27 April 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Otolaryngology)
Study Objectives: Evaluating daytime neuromuscular electrical training (NMES) of tongue muscles in individuals with Primary Snoring and Mild Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA). Methods: A multicenter prospective study was undertaken in patients with primary snoring and mild sleep apnea where daytime NMES (eXciteOSA® Signifier Medical Technologies Ltd., London W6 0LG, UK) was used for 20 min once daily for 6 weeks. Change in percentage time spent snoring was analyzed using a two-night sleep study before and after therapy. Participants and their bed partners completed sleep quality questionnaires: Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and the bed partners reported on the nighttime snoring using a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Results: Of 125 patients recruited, 115 patients completed the trial. Ninety percent of the study population had some reduction in objective snoring with the mean reduction in the study population of 41% (p < 0.001). Bed partner-reported snoring reduced significantly by 39% (p < 0.001). ESS and total PSQI scores reduced significantly (p < 0.001) as well as bed partner PSQI (p = 0.017). No serious adverse events were reported. Conclusions: Daytime NMES (eXciteOSA®) is demonstrated to be effective at reducing objective and subjective snoring. It is associated with effective improvement in patient and bed partner sleep quality and patient daytime somnolence. Both objective and subjective measures demonstrated a consistent improvement. Daytime NMES was well tolerated and had minimal transient side effects. View Full-Text
Keywords: neuromuscular electrical stimulation; tongue; snoring; decibels; sleep; tolerability; mild OSA; sleep disordered breathing neuromuscular electrical stimulation; tongue; snoring; decibels; sleep; tolerability; mild OSA; sleep disordered breathing
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MDPI and ACS Style

Baptista, P.M.; Martínez Ruiz de Apodaca, P.; Carrasco, M.; Fernandez, S.; Wong, P.Y.; Zhang, H.; Hassaan, A.; Kotecha, B. Daytime Neuromuscular Electrical Therapy of Tongue Muscles in Improving Snoring in Individuals with Primary Snoring and Mild Obstructive Sleep Apnea. J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10, 1883. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10091883

AMA Style

Baptista PM, Martínez Ruiz de Apodaca P, Carrasco M, Fernandez S, Wong PY, Zhang H, Hassaan A, Kotecha B. Daytime Neuromuscular Electrical Therapy of Tongue Muscles in Improving Snoring in Individuals with Primary Snoring and Mild Obstructive Sleep Apnea. Journal of Clinical Medicine. 2021; 10(9):1883. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10091883

Chicago/Turabian Style

Baptista, Peter M., Paula Martínez Ruiz de Apodaca, Marina Carrasco, Secundino Fernandez, Phui Y. Wong, Henry Zhang, Amro Hassaan, and Bhik Kotecha. 2021. "Daytime Neuromuscular Electrical Therapy of Tongue Muscles in Improving Snoring in Individuals with Primary Snoring and Mild Obstructive Sleep Apnea" Journal of Clinical Medicine 10, no. 9: 1883. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10091883

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