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Article

Lifestyle and Psychological Factors of Women with Pregnancy Intentions Who Become Pregnant: Analysis of a Longitudinal Cohort of Australian Women

1
Monash Centre for Health Research and Implementation, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, 43-51 Kanooka Grove, Clayton 3168, Australia
2
School of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Queensland, 288 Herston Road, Herston, Brisbane 4006, Australia
3
Warwick Business School, Warwick University, Scarman Rd., Coventry CV4 7AL, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Annemarie Koster
J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10(4), 725; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10040725
Received: 4 December 2020 / Revised: 4 February 2021 / Accepted: 8 February 2021 / Published: 12 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Prevention of Maternal Obesity: Lifestyle Health and Beyond)
Preconception lifestyle and psychological factors are associated with maternal and offspring outcomes. Both are important considerations for women planning pregnancy. The aim of this study was to explore associations between lifestyle/psychological factors and long-term pregnancy intentions in women who go on to become pregnant. Data from the cohort born 1973–1978 from the Australian Longitudinal Study of Women’s Health were utilised. Women were included if they had a new pregnancy occurring between Waves 3 and 5, resulting in 2203 women for analysis. Long-term pregnancy intentions (aspirations for children in 5–10 years), demographic, anthropometric, lifestyle (sedentary behaviour, physical activity, diet quality, smoking, alcohol use), and psychological factors (depression, anxiety, stress) were assessed at Wave 3. Multivariable logistic regression was employed to evaluate the associations between pregnancy intentions and lifestyle/psychological factors, adjusting for other explanatory variables. Younger age and being married were associated positively with pregnancy intentions, while living with obesity was associated negatively with pregnancy intentions. No lifestyle or psychological factors were significantly associated with pregnancy intentions. Our findings highlight potential opportunities to identify women who have longer-term pregnancy intentions during clinical care, offering a pivotal moment for preconception care relating to lifestyle health, psychological wellbeing, and family planning. View Full-Text
Keywords: preconception; pregnancy intention; parenthood aspiration; lifestyle; health behaviour; psychological wellbeing preconception; pregnancy intention; parenthood aspiration; lifestyle; health behaviour; psychological wellbeing
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MDPI and ACS Style

Hill, B.; Awoke, M.A.; Bergmeier, H.; Moran, L.J.; Mishra, G.D.; Skouteris, H. Lifestyle and Psychological Factors of Women with Pregnancy Intentions Who Become Pregnant: Analysis of a Longitudinal Cohort of Australian Women. J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10, 725. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10040725

AMA Style

Hill B, Awoke MA, Bergmeier H, Moran LJ, Mishra GD, Skouteris H. Lifestyle and Psychological Factors of Women with Pregnancy Intentions Who Become Pregnant: Analysis of a Longitudinal Cohort of Australian Women. Journal of Clinical Medicine. 2021; 10(4):725. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10040725

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hill, Briony, Mamaru A. Awoke, Heidi Bergmeier, Lisa J. Moran, Gita D. Mishra, and Helen Skouteris. 2021. "Lifestyle and Psychological Factors of Women with Pregnancy Intentions Who Become Pregnant: Analysis of a Longitudinal Cohort of Australian Women" Journal of Clinical Medicine 10, no. 4: 725. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10040725

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